Retrosheet


Fun With Retrosheet Data, Episode 6

By Tom Ruane

A while back, I started collecting my Retrosheet posts in a place on the web-site. This series eventually grew to encompass several articles. Here are the others:

Fun With Retrosheet Data
Fun With Retrosheet Data, the Sequel
Fun With Retrosheet Data, Episode 3
Fun With Retrosheet Data, Episode 4
Fun With Retrosheet Data, Episode 5

I hope at least some of this is of general interest and, as always:

Thanks for your patience.

List of Articles (starting with most recent)

Extra-Inning Season and Career Batting Records (October 19, 2019)
Extra-Inning Single Game Batting Records (September 29, 2019)
Second (and third) Generation Major League Players (September 14, 2019)
Perhaps the Most Improbable Comebacks From 1901 to 2018 (May 13, 2019)
Runs Produced By The Most and Fewest Hits (September 12, 2018)
Changes In Pitch Outcomes: 1988-2016 (July 2, 2017)
Fun with a Team's OPS (June 20, 2016)
A Look at Run Differentials (June 18, 2016)
Starting Pitching Lines (May 24, 2015)
The Greatest Incomplete Starts (May 20, 2015)
Most Surprising Pitching Performances (July 5, 2014)
Both Starting Pitchers Making MLB Exits (May 26, 2014)
Both Starting Pitchers Making MLB Debuts (May 19, 2014)
The Age of Starting Lineups (May 5, 2014)
Hot Starts to Careers, the Pitching Edition (April 29, 2014)
Hot Starts to Careers, the Batting Edition (April 28, 2014)
Hard to Hit Pitchers (April 5, 2014)
Unique Batting Lines (August 26, 2012)
Come-From-Behind Wins and Losses (July 8, 2012)
A Tour of Team Pitching Logs (July 7, 2012)
A Tour of Team Batting Logs (July 5, 2012)
Consecutive Winless Starts (June 23, 2012)
Low-Hit Clusters (June 19, 2012)
When Winning Streaks Collide (June 14, 2012)
Defensive Juggling (May 8, 2012)
Incomplete Games By Position (April 8, 2012)
A Look at Triple-Crown Leaders (December 19, 2011)
Do Only Slow Runners Ground into a Lot of DPs? (December 15, 2011)
The Homering-est Teammates (and Multiple Debuts) (December 12, 2011)
Multiple Hitting Streaks (November 29, 2011)
The Most Exciting Games (October 28, 2011)
League Leaders With the Fewest Games Played (October 14, 2011)
Nelson Cruz Made Me Do It (October 15, 2011)
Players With The Highest Percentage of Post-Season Homers (October 7, 2011)
Doubling Their Home Runs (September 27, 2011)
Top Hitting Streaks By Batting Order and Defensive Position (September 27, 2011)
Come-From-Behind Batting Champions, An Update (September 26, 2011)
Best Career Marks By Park (September 24, 2011)
Come-From-Behind Batting Champions (September 23, 2011)
Best Career Hitters By Lineup Position (September 18, 2011)
Best Hitters By Lineup Position (September 16, 2011)
More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About 1-0 Games (September 15, 2011)
Best/Worst Month for a Team's Pitchers (September 14, 2011)
Batters Supporting Starting Pitchers (September 10, 2011)
Most Strikeouts Between Hits Allowed... And Then Some (September 5, 2011)
Double-Digits In Strikeouts and Hits Allowed (September 3, 2011)
Bases-Loaded Plate Appearances (August 31, 2011)
Palindromic At-Bat Line (August 27, 2011)
Most At-Bats With the Bases Loaded (August 25, 2011)
Starting Infields, Then And Now (August 24, 2011)
Easy schedule runs (July 15, 2011)
Parity Comes to MLB (May 29, 2011)
Two .400 Hitters on a Team (May 3, 2011)
Pitcher versus Team (July 22, 2010)
Expected Pitcher Match-Ups (July 21, 2010)
Consecutive Starts With IPs greater than or equal to Hits (July 19, 2010)
Consecutive Starts With Ks greater than or equal to IPs (July 17,2010)
Pitcher Match-Ups (July 16, 2010)
Most Blown Saves Combo (June 3, 2009)

Second (and third) Generation Major League Players

In light of the debuts of Bo Bichette, Cavan Biggio, and Vladimir Guerrero Jr. in Toronto this year, SABR member and Retrosheet volunteer Bruce Fleming asked me if I knew the record for the most sons of major leaguers to appear in the same game. This made me realize that I'd never really done anything with our data on baseball relatives. So I figured I'd play around with it for a while and see what I could find.

(And apologies in advance if any or much of this is already well-known to everyone but me.)

Before answering Bruce's question, I thought I'd take a quick look at the history of second-generation major leaguers. Here are the first ten od these sons to make it to the majors:

   Date       Son                      Father
 7- 2-1903    Jack Doscher             Herm Doscher
 7- 9-1904    Ed McNichol              Bob McNichol (umpire)
 8-15-1908    Queenie O'Rourke         Jim O'Rourke
 8-22-1910    Bob Meinke               Frank Meinke
10- 5-1910    Earle Mack               Connie Mack
 5-31-1915(1) Lew Malone               J.R. Malone (umpire)
 9-22-1917    Jimmy Cooney             Jimmy Cooney
 4-19-1921    Johnny Cooney            Jimmy Cooney
 7-18-1921    Joe Berry                Joe Berry
 6-15-1925    Charlie Berry            Charlie Berry

As you can see, the first player to follow in his father's footsteps to the majors was left-hander Jack Doscher, who started for the Cubs and lost on July 2, 1903. That would be his only appearance for Chicago before moving on to Brooklyn and then Cincinnati, ending his career in 1908 with a 2-10 record. His father, Herm Doscher, had a similarly undistinguised career for five different clubs over parts of six seasons, mostly as a weak-hitting third-baseman.

You probably noticed that two of the first ten players were sons of umpires, which probably don't belong in this study, but I thought they were interesting and so decided to leave them in, at least at the start. They won't be included below, so removing the McNichols and Malones above require these additions:

   Date       Son                      Father
 4-16-1927    Art Mills                Willie Mills
 7- 4-1928(1) Ed Walsh                 Ed Walsh

With the exception of the two Hall of Fame fathers, this is not a distinguished group of pairings. The Joe Berry father-son duo combined for 10 at-bats in the majors, while the Mills pitchers failed to win a single major league game. Of course, you wouldn't expect to find two Hall of Famers in ten random pairs of players and I suspect the accomplishments of the ten sons, which include one (Johnny Cooney the Younger, who lasted in the majors for twenty years), are not much worse than you'd get from a random draw.

Removing non-playing fathers from the mix, here are the number of second generation major leaguers each year since 1900:

        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
190x    0   0   0   1   1   1   1   0   2   0
191x    2   1   0   0   1   0   0   1   0   1
192x    0   2   2   1   2   3   2   4   6   5
193x    4   4   3   5   3   6   6   5  11  11
194x   12  15  11  11  12  10  13  10  10   9
195x    7   7   6   5   5   6   7   8  11   8
196x    7   9   7  10  12  11  12  12   9  13
197x   11   8  11  14  12  11  13  16  18  16
198x   15  17  19  16  20  19  24  23  22  27
199x   29  31  31  33  29  33  34  35  36  38
200x   38  36  35  30  31  29  33  33  30  32
201x   33  35  37  35  38  37  34  27  28

I thought it might be interesting to look at a chronology of the record for the most sons of major leaguers to appear in a game.

1 PHI N(0) @ BRO N(1)  4-17-1905    Jack Doscher
2 STL N(1) @ BOS N(1)  6- 7-1924    Jimmy Cooney, Johnny Cooney
3 WAS A(0) @ CHI A(3)  9-11-1932(2) Billy Sullivan, Charlie Berry, Ed Walsh
4 PHI N(1) @ BRO N(3)  9-30-1939(1) Del Young, Dixie Walker, Gene Moore, Bill Crouch
5 CHI A(3) @ CAL A(2)  6-13-1984    Vance Law, Joel Skinner, Bob Boone, Dick Schofield, Jerry Hairston
6 CAL A(2) @ CHI A(4)  9- 8-1984    Dick Schofield, Bob Boone, Jerry Hairston, Roy Smalley, Vance Law, Joel Skinner
7 CAL A(3) @ TOR A(4)  9-10-1993    Eduardo Perez, Kurt Stillwell, Roberto Alomar, Ed Sprague, Todd Stottlemyre, Stan Javier, Dick Schofield
7 TOR A(3) @ CLE A(4) 10- 2-1999    Jose Cruz, David Segui, Darrin Fletcher, Roberto Alomar, Sandy Alomar, Jaret Wright, Chris Haney
7 TOR A(3) @ SEA A(4)  8- 7-2001    Jose Cruz, Darrin Fletcher, Bret Boone, David Bell, Pedro Borbon, Stan Javier, Ed Sprague
7 NY  N(2) @ SD  N(5)  6- 2-2010    Ike Davis, Jerry Hairston, Scott Hairston, Will Venable, Gary Matthews, Tony Gwynn, Ryan Webb
7 SD  N(4) @ PIT N(3)  7-23-2010    Jerry Hairston, Scott Hairston, Neil Walker, Will Venable, Andy LaRoche, Tony Gwynn, Bobby Crosby
7 SD  N(5) @ PIT N(2)  7-25-2010    Jerry Hairston, Will Venable, Scott Hairston, Neil Walker, Ryan Webb, Tony Gwynn, Bobby Crosby
7 SD  N(4) @ ARI N(3)  8- 7-2010    Will Venable, Tony Gwynn, Adam LaRoche, Rusty Ryal, Bobby Crosby, Scott Hairston, Jerry Hairston

The number in parenthesis following each team name is the number of sons on the team in that game. I showed all seven instances of the current record holders/

Two teams have had five sons of major leaguers appear in the same game. One team, the 2010 Padres, did it 13 times. The first and last:

5 SD  N(5) @ HOU N(0)  5- 9-2010    Tony Gwynn, Will Venable, Scott Hairston, Jerry Hairston, Ryan Webb
5 FLA N(0) @ SD  N(5)  7-31-2010    Jerry Hairston, Will Venable, Scott Hairston, Tony Gwynn, Ryan Webb

The other was the 2012 Dodgers, who did it 5 times. Again, the first and last:

5 STL N(0) @ LA  N(5)  5-20-2012    Tony Gwynn, Justin Sellers, Ivan De Jesus, Scott Van Slyke, Dee Gordon
6 LA  N(5) @ COL N(1)  6- 1-2012    Tony Gwynn, Ivan De Jesus, Jerry Hairston, Scott Van Slyke, Dee Gordon

The 2012 Dodgers had six sons play for them that season, but the record for the most second generation sons on a team's roster is seven for the 2000 Indians. The sons included Roberto Alomar, Sandy Alomar, Chris Haney, Jaime Navarro, David Segui, Justin Speier and Jaret Wright, but no more than four played together in any one game.

Next, I'd like to look at how these sons did in various statistical categories. To give you some idea of what I mean, here are the sons of major leaguers who combined for the most hits in a game:

Hits:
 8-4 CHI N( 5-2) @ STL N( 3-2)  4-28-1946(1) Don Johnson(4), Charlie Gilbert(1), Harry Walker(2), Dick Sisler(1)
 7-2 BOS N( 3-1) @ BRO N( 4-1)  8-21-1937    Gene Moore(3), Johnny Cooney(4)
 7-2 PHI N( 0-0) @ BRO N( 7-2)  9-30-1939(1) Dixie Walker(3), Gene Moore(4)
 7-2 BOS N( 7-2) @ CHI N( 0-0)  9-14-1941(1) Johnny Cooney(3), Gene Moore(4)

The first number in each rown is the total number of hits by the sons in the game, while the second number is the number of sons with at least one hit. That is followed by the breakdown for each team, the game date, and a list of all the contributing players.

Not only did the sons in the first game above combined for the most hits in game, but it was also the only time that four sons had one or more hits in the same game.

Here are similar lists for doubles, triples, homers, RBIs, walks and strikeouts:

Doubles:
 5-3 SF  N( 3-2) @ MON N( 2-1)  5-31-1996    Stan Javier(1), Barry Bonds(2), David Segui(2)
 5-3 STL N( 0-0) @ SF  N( 5-3)  6- 9-1996    Barry Bonds(1), Mark Carreon(3), Stan Javier(1)
 5-2 OAK A( 5-2) @ CLE A( 0-0)  8-29-1998    Ben Grieve(3), Scott Spiezio(2)
 5-3 TEX A( 0-0) @ SEA A( 5-3)  4-14-1999    David Bell(2), David Segui(2), Ken Griffey(1)
 5-3 SD  N( 0-0) @ SEA A( 5-3)  7-15-1999    David Bell(3), David Segui(1), Ken Griffey(1)
 5-3 SF  N( 4-2) @ HOU N( 1-1)  4-20-2002    David Bell(2), Barry Bonds(2), Daryle Ward(1)
 5-3 DET A( 1-1) @ CLE A( 4-2)  8- 7-2013    Nick Swisher(2), Prince Fielder(1), Michael Brantley(2)

 4-4 OAK A( 2-2) @ SEA A( 2-2)  4-11-1999    David Bell(1), David Segui(1), Scott Spiezio(1), Ben Grieve(1)
 4-4 LA  N( 4-4) @ COL N( 0-0)  6- 1-2012    Tony Gwynn(1), Ivan De Jesus(1), Jerry Hairston(1), Scott Van Slyke(1)

While the first groups shows the games with the most total hits, the second grouping shows the games with the most contributing players.

Triples:
A whole lot of teams with two triples and two sons.
Homers:
 4-3 SEA A( 4-3) @ TB  A( 0-0)  4-24-1999    David Segui(1), Ken Griffey(2), David Bell(1)
 4-3 SD  N( 2-1) @ CIN N( 2-2)  5-11-2000    Bret Boone(2), Ken Griffey(1), Aaron Boone(1)
 4-2 SD  N( 3-1) @ CIN N( 1-1)  6-23-2000    Ken Griffey(1), Bret Boone(3)
 4-2 TOR A( 4-2) @ TEX A( 0-0)  8-27-2000    Darrin Fletcher(3), Jose Cruz(1)
 4-2 TOR A( 2-1) @ SEA A( 2-1)  5- 6-2001    Darrin Fletcher(2), Bret Boone(2)
 4-3 SF  N( 2-2) @ PIT N( 2-1)  5- 1-2005    Moises Alou(1), Lance Niekro(1), Daryle Ward(2)

 3-3 MON N( 1-1) @ SF  N( 2-2)  9- 5-1995    David Segui(1), Barry Bonds(1), Mark Carreon(1)
 3-3 TOR A( 2-2) @ BOS A( 1-1)  7-23-1998    Darrin Fletcher(1), Ed Sprague(1), Damon Buford(1)
 3-3 SEA A( 3-3) @ COL N( 0-0)  6- 9-1999    David Bell(1), Ken Griffey(1), David Segui(1)
 3-3 CIN N( 2-2) @ HOU N( 1-1)  5-15-2000    Ken Griffey(1), Aaron Boone(1), Daryle Ward(1)
 3-3 CHI N( 2-2) @ SF  N( 1-1)  4-29-2001    Barry Bonds(1), Damon Buford(1), Gary Matthews(1)
 3-3 PIT N( 2-2) @ HOU N( 1-1)  8-17-2001    Moises Alou(1), Jason Kendall(1), Gary Matthews(1)
 3-3 MIL N( 1-1) @ STL N( 2-2) 10- 1-2006    Prince Fielder(1), Chris Duncan(1), Scott Spiezio(1)
 3-3 PIT N( 1-1) @ CIN N( 2-2)  6-30-2008    Jerry Hairston(1), Adam LaRoche(1), Ken Griffey(1)
 3-3 LA  N( 1-1) @ PIT N( 2-2)  7-22-2014    Neil Walker(1), Ike Davis(1), Scott Van Slyke(1)
RBIs:
11-2 MON N(11-2) @ COL N( 0-0)  4-28-1996    David Segui(6), Darrin Fletcher(5)
10-3 PHI N( 7-2) @ CHI N( 3-1)  5-17-1979    Del Unser(2), Bob Boone(5), Jerry Martin(3)
10-2 SD  N( 6-1) @ CIN N( 4-1)  6-23-2000    Ken Griffey(4), Bret Boone(6)
10-3 TEX A( 0-0) @ SEA A(10-3)  6- 4-2001    Stan Javier(1), Bret Boone(7), David Bell(2)
10-4 SF  N( 7-2) @ MIL N( 3-2)  9-22-2006    Barry Bonds(6), Moises Alou(1), Prince Fielder(1), David Bell(2)

Several other games had four different sons with RBIs.
Walks:
 7-3 PIT N( 2-1) @ CIN N( 5-2)  5-18-2000    Jason Kendall(2), Ken Griffey(4), Aaron Boone(1)
 7-3 LA  N( 3-1) @ SF  N( 4-2)  4-13-2003    Todd Hundley(3), Barry Bonds(3), Jose Cruz(1)

 4-4 CAL A( 2-2) @ CHI A( 2-2)  9- 7-1984    Dick Schofield(1), Bob Boone(1), Vance Law(1), Jerry Hairston(1)
 5-4 NY  N( 2-1) @ MON N( 3-3)  9- 9-1995    Damon Buford(2), David Segui(1), Darrin Fletcher(1), Moises Alou(1)
 6-4 OAK A( 3-2) @ TOR A( 3-2)  8- 8-1998    Ben Grieve(2), Jose Cruz(2), Ed Sprague(1), Darrin Fletcher(1)
 4-4 SF  N( 2-2) @ SD  N( 2-2)  7- 5-2003    Barry Bonds(1), Jose Cruz(1), Sean Burroughs(1), Gary Matthews(1)
 4-4 SF  N( 2-2) @ SD  N( 2-2)  9-11-2003    Sean Burroughs(1), Barry Bonds(1), Jose Cruz(1), Gary Matthews(1)
 4-4 CLE A( 1-1) @ OAK A( 3-3)  7-27-2005    Jason Kendall(1), Nick Swisher(1), Bobby Crosby(1), Aaron Boone(1)
 4-4 OAK A( 3-3) @ NY  A( 1-1)  5-13-2006    Nick Swisher(1), Robinson Cano(1), Bobby Crosby(1), Jason Kendall(1)
 4-4 PIT N( 2-2) @ MIL N( 2-2)  4-27-2009    Adam LaRoche(1), Andy LaRoche(1), Prince Fielder(1), Jason Kendall(1)
 4-4 MIL N( 1-1) @ SD  N( 3-3)  4-30-2010    Tony Gwynn(1), Prince Fielder(1), Will Venable(1), Jerry Hairston(1)
Strikeouts:
10-4 TOR A( 5-2) @ NY  N( 5-2)  9- 2-1997    Jose Cruz(3), Brian McRae(3), Todd Hundley(2), Ed Sprague(2)

 5-5 CAL A( 2-2) @ KC  A( 3-3)  9-26-1991    Ruben Amaro(1), Brian McRae(1), Dick Schofield(1), Danny Tartabull(1), David Howard(1)
 5-5 SF  N( 2-2) @ MIL N( 3-3)  9-23-2006    Barry Bonds(1), Moises Alou(1), Prince Fielder(1), David Bell(1), Tony Gwynn(1)
 7-5 SD  N( 6-4) @ NY  N( 1-1)  6- 8-2010    Scott Hairston(2), Ike Davis(1), Will Venable(1), Jerry Hairston(2), Tony Gwynn(1)
 8-5 LA  N( 5-3) @ PIT N( 3-2)  7-23-2014    Dee Gordon(1), Scott Van Slyke(3), Neil Walker(2), Ike Davis(1), Drew Butera(1)

Switching over to pitchers, here are the sons combining for the most innings pitched in a game:

16.1-2 CLE A(7.1-1) @ BOS A(9-1)    6-17-1955(2) George Susce(7.1), Ray Narleski(9)
16  -2 DET A(8-1) @ TEX A(8-1)      4-23-1997    Darren Oliver(8), Omar Olivares(8)
15.2-2 OAK A(7.1-1) @ KC  A(8.1-1)  5-20-1995    Chris Haney(7.1), Todd Stottlemyre(8.1)
15  -1 BRO N( 0-0) @ BOS N(15-1)    6-21-1929    Johnny Cooney(15)
15  -2 KC  A(8-1) @ WAS A(7-1)      7-26-1967    Joe Coleman(8), Lew Krausse(7)

 8.1-3 TOR A(8-2) @ OAK A(.1-1)     4-26-2000    Omar Olivares(6), T.J. Mathews(2), Pedro Borbon(.1)
 3.1-3 DET A(1.1-2) @ ANA A(2-1)    7-28-2007    Jason Grilli(2), Justin Speier(.1), Darren Oliver(1)
 9.1-3 ANA A(6.2-1) @ KC  A(2.2-2)  5- 6-2008    Brian Bannister(6.2), Darren Oliver(1.2), Justin Speier(1)
 3  -3 ANA A(1-1) @ TEX A(2-2)      6-29-2009    Darren Oliver(1), Jason Grilli(1), Justin Speier(1)

And the sons with the most hits allowed, walks and strikeouts:

Hits allowed:
19-2 MIL A( 8-1) @ KC  A(11-1)  6- 6-1993    Chris Haney(8), Jaime Navarro(11)
19-2 CHI A( 9-1) @ TEX A(10-1)  8-22-1997    Darren Oliver(9), Jaime Navarro(10)
18-2 MIL A(11-1) @ TOR A( 7-1)  5-27-1992    Todd Stottlemyre(11), Jaime Navarro(7)
17-2 CHI A(10-1) @ CLE A( 7-1)  8-31-1980(2) Ross Grimsley(10), Steve Trout(7)
17-2 CLE A( 9-1) @ TEX A( 8-1)  8- 1-1997    Darren Oliver(9), Jaret Wright(8)
Walks:
10-1 BAL A(10-1) @ DET A( 0-0) 10- 1-1974    Joe Coleman(10)
10-2 STL N( 4-1) @ FLA N( 6-1)  9-26-1993    Omar Olivares(6), Robb Nen(4)
 9-1 BRO N( 0-0) @ BOS N( 9-1)  6-21-1929    Johnny Cooney(9)
 9-2 BOS A( 0-0) @ NY  A( 9-2)  9-22-1957    Dave Sisler(8), George Susce(1)
 9-1 TEX A( 9-1) @ OAK A( 0-0)  9-23-1977    Matt Keough(9)

 4-3 TOR A( 3-2) @ OAK A( 1-1)  4-26-2000    Omar Olivares(2), T.J. Mathews(1), Pedro Borbon(1)
Strikeouts:
15-1 KC  A(15-1) @ OAK A( 0-0)  6-16-1995    Todd Stottlemyre(15)
14-1 WAS A(14-1) @ DET A( 0-0)  9-15-1971    Joe Coleman(14)
13-1 STL N( 0-0) @ FLA N(13-1)  5-15-1996    Todd Stottlemyre(13)
13-1 MIL N(13-1) @ STL N( 0-0)  5-11-1998    Todd Stottlemyre(13)
12-1 KC  A(12-1) @ BOS A( 0-0)  9-15-1964    Ed Connolly(12)
12-1 CAL A(12-1) @ OAK A( 0-0)  9-20-1995    Todd Stottlemyre(12)
12-2 FLA N( 6-1) @ ATL N( 6-1)  4-16-2004    Jaret Wright(6), Darren Oliver(6)
12-1 CHI A(12-1) @ HOU A( 0-0)  7- 6-2018    Lance McCullers(12)

 6-3 ANA A( 3-1) @ KC  A( 3-2)  5- 6-2008    Brian Bannister(3), Darren Oliver(2), Justin Speier(1)

So much for sons of major leaguers. How about looking at this in reverse: what games had the most fathers of future major leaguers in a game? Well, here are the first ten fathers (and some of these will be familiar):

   Date       Father                   Son(s)
 4-26-1872    Jim O'Rourke             Queenie O'Rourke
 9- 5-1872    Herm Doscher             Jack Doscher
 4-30-1884    Charlie Berry            Charlie Berry
 9-27-1884    Charlie Ganzel           Babe Ganzel
 5- 1-1884    Frank Meinke             Bob Meinke
 9-11-1886    Connie Mack              Earle Mack
 8- 3-1888    Willard Mains            Jim Mains
 4-19-1890    Jimmy Cooney             Jimmy Cooney, Johnny Cooney
 9-13-1899    Billy Sullivan           Billy Sullivan
 7-13-1901    Willie Mills             Art Mills

And here's a similar chart showing the number of fathers of major leaguers by year:

        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
187x        0   2   2   1   2   1   1   1   2
188x    1   2   2   1   4   3   3   3   4   3
189x    4   5   4   3   2   2   3   1   0   1
190x    1   2   3   2   3   4   5   6   8  10
191x    9   7  13   7  10  12   9   9   8   6
192x   11  12  15  11  12   8   9   7   6   9
193x    9   7   9   7   7   7   7   8  11  14
194x   14  13  15  14  13   8  13  12  13  12
195x   15  16  14  12  12  13  16  18  17  16
196x   24  21  29  28  33  33  32  29  34  38
197x   43  40  42  39  42  42  43  42  35  37
198x   37  34  38  38  33  40  41  39  37  36
199x   30  26  24  23  21  23  19  15  12  11
200x    9  11   8   5   5   5   4   3   2   2
201x    1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

Obviously, the data for the last few decades will look quite a bit different years from now. At the start of the 2019 season, the last father with a major league son was Ivan Rodriguez whose son Dereck Rodriguez debuted in 2018. But Vladimir Guerrero tied him this year, since he and Ivan both played their last game on September 28, 2011.

And the record chronology:

1 TRO n(1) @ MAN n(0)  4-26-1872    Jim O'Rourke
2 ???
3 CHI A(2) @ WAS A(1)  7-19-1906(1) Billy Sullivan, Ed Walsh, Howard Wakefield
4 CHI A(2) @ PHI A(2)  7-10-1912    Wally Mattick, Ed Walsh, Eddie Collins, Harl Maggert
5 PHI A(2) @ CHI A(3)  8- 9-1912    Harl Maggert, Eddie Collins, Wally Mattick, Ernie Johnson, Ed Walsh
6 CHI A(3) @ CLE A(3)  7- 4-1921(2) Ernie Johnson, Eddie Collins, Earl Sheely, Smoky Joe Wood, Jim Bagby, Guy Morton
7 CIN N(5) @ SF  N(2)  5-18-1972    Pete Rose, Hal McRae, Julian Javier, Chris Speier, Bobby Bonds, Pedro Borbon, Ed Sprague
8 CIN N(5) @ SD  N(3)  5-21-1972(2) Pete Rose, Hal McRae, Johnny Jeter, Ed Spiezio, Fred Kendall, Pedro Borbon, Julian Javier, Ed Sprague
8 CIN N(5) @ SF  N(3)  9-20-1973    Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Bobby Bonds, Gary Matthews, Chris Speier, Ed Crosby, Ken Griffey, Pedro Borbon

It seems very likely that the first occurrence of two fathers in the same game occurred prior to the start of our game coverage in 1905. And as before, I showed all instances of the current record holders, the two games played by the Reds in 1972 and 1973.

Now the lists above in this section counted any player who at some point fathered a future major leaguer, but what if you only counted those players whose son had been born on or before the game in question? Obviously, this would dramatically alter these lists. Anyway, that's what I went and did and here are the results.

The first ten fathers:

   Date       Father                   Son(s)
      1881    Herm Doscher             Jack Doscher
      1884    Jim O'Rourke             Queenie O'Rourke
      1890    Connie Mack              Earle Mack
 9- 4-1902    Joe Berry                Joe Berry
 5- 9-1905    Ed Walsh                 Ed Walsh
 4-16-1908    Patsy O'Rourke           Joe O'Rourke
 9-22-1908    Ralph Savidge            Don Savidge
 9-28-1909    Gene Moore               Gene Moore
 7-12-1910    Bill Crouch              Bill Crouch
 9-25-1910(1) Dixie Walker             Dixie Walker, and 8 years later, Harry Walker

Dixie Walker's game above came the day after his first son was born. He lost 2-1.

And here's the adjusted chart of fathers by year.

        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
187x    x   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
188x    0   1   1   0   1   1   1   1   1   1
189x    2   2   2   2   1   1   1   0   0   0
190x    0   0   1   0   1   1   1   1   3   3
191x    4   3   5   1   3   3   5   6   6   4
192x    6   9  11   8   8   6   5   4   3   4
193x    3   3   3   1   3   2   5   5   6   7
194x    7   6   7   8   9   6   7   8   9   8
195x    8  10   9   8   6   7  10  13  10  10
196x   12  10  17  16  16  17  19  16  20  26
197x   29  25  26  22  27  23  25  27  22  24
198x   22  23  26  26  26  27  30  32  32  30
199x   23  21  22  21  20  23  19  15  12  11
200x    9  11   8   5   5   5   4   3   2   2
201x    1   1

And finally, the record chronology, starting with the first game with three fathers:

3 DET A(0) @ CHI A(3)  9- 3-1912(2) Billy Sullivan, Ernie Johnson, Ed Walsh
4 CHI A(3) @ STL A(1)  4-18-1921    Ernie Johnson, Eddie Collins, Earl Sheely, George Sisler
5 CLE A(2) @ CHI A(3)  4-30-1921    Smoky Joe Wood, Jim Bagby, Ernie Johnson, Eddie Collins, Earl Sheely
6 STL N(3) @ PIT N(3)  5-15-1965    Tito Francona, Julian Javier, Dick Schofield, Vern Law, Bob Skinner, Ozzie Virgil
7 MON N(1) @ CIN N(6)  6-20-1972    Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Clyde Mashore, Ed Sprague, Pedro Borbon, Julian Javier, Hal McRae
7 CHI N(2) @ CIN N(5)  7- 9-1972(1) Don Kessinger, Randy Hundley, Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Pedro Borbon, Ed Sprague, Hal McRae
7 CHI N(1) @ CIN N(6)  7- 9-1972(2) Don Kessinger, Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Julian Javier, Pedro Borbon, Ed Sprague, Hal McRae
7 LA  N(2) @ CIN N(5)  8- 8-1972    Manny Mota, Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Maury Wills, Hal McRae, Julian Javier, Pedro Borbon
7 CIN N(5) @ LA  N(2)  9- 4-1972(1) Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Hal McRae, Manny Mota, Pedro Borbon, Maury Wills, Ed Sprague
7 LA  N(2) @ CIN N(5)  9-30-1972    Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Hal McRae, Manny Mota, Julian Javier, Pedro Borbon, Maury Wills
7 CIN N(4) @ SF  N(3)  9-19-1974    Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Ken Griffey, Bobby Bonds, Gary Matthews, Chris Speier, Pedro Borbon
7 CIN N(4) @ SF  N(3)  9-21-1974    Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Ken Griffey, Bobby Bonds, Gary Matthews, Chris Speier, Pedro Borbon
7 SF  N(3) @ CIN N(4)  9-27-1974    Bobby Bonds, Gary Matthews, Chris Speier, Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Ken Griffey, Pedro Borbon
7 SF  N(3) @ CIN N(4)  9-29-1974    Bobby Bonds, Gary Matthews, Pete Rose, Tony Perez, Ken Griffey, Chris Speier, Pedro Borbon

I listed all ten of the games in which seven fathers took part, every one of them involving the Reds from 1972 to 1974.

Like above, let's look at the combined stats of the fathers, again only counting those who children had arrived prior to the game in question. Here are the same batting categories as above.

Hits:
12-4 CHI A( 8-3) @ STL A( 4-1)  6- 2-1922    Ernie Johnson(3), Eddie Collins(2), Earl Sheely(3), George Sisler(4)
12-4 STL A( 3-1) @ CHI A( 9-3)  8-12-1922    George Sisler(3), Ernie Johnson(2), Eddie Collins(3), Earl Sheely(4)
11-4 STL A( 5-1) @ CHI A( 6-3)  8-30-1921    George Sisler(5), Ernie Johnson(1), Eddie Collins(3), Earl Sheely(2)
10-3 DET A( 0-0) @ CHI A(10-3)  9- 9-1921    Ernie Johnson(3), Eddie Collins(2), Earl Sheely(5)
10-4 CHI A( 7-3) @ STL A( 3-1)  9-30-1922    Ernie Johnson(3), Eddie Collins(2), Earl Sheely(2), George Sisler(3)
10-4 ATL N( 7-2) @ PIT N( 3-2)  6- 2-1968(1) Felipe Alou(4), Tito Francona(3), Maury Wills(2), Manny Mota(1)

 8-5 CHI A( 6-3) @ CLE A( 2-2)  7-23-1922    Ernie Johnson(3), Eddie Collins(1), Earl Sheely(2), Smoky Joe Wood(1), Jim Bagby(1)
Doubles:
 5-2 NY  A( 5-2) @ CHI A( 0-0)  7-22-1975    Bobby Bonds(2), Sandy Alomar(3)
 5-4 SF  N( 1-1) @ CIN N( 4-3)  4-16-1976    Gary Matthews(1), Pete Rose(1), Ken Griffey(2), Tony Perez(1)
Triples:
 3-2 NY  N( 0-0) @ PHI N( 3-2)  6- 2-1981    Pete Rose(2), Gary Matthews(1)

There were lots of games in which two fathers combined to hit two triples.
Homers:
 4-2 CIN N( 4-2) @ CHI N( 0-0)  5- 8-1970    Tony Perez(2), Hal McRae(2)
 4-3 CIN N( 4-3) @ CHI N( 0-0)  5- 9-1976    Pete Rose(1), Ken Griffey(1), Tony Perez(2)
 4-2 CIN N( 4-2) @ NY  N( 0-0)  4-29-1978    Pete Rose(3), Ken Griffey(1)

 3-3 SF  N( 1-1) @ LA  N( 2-2)  7-13-1969    Bobby Bonds(1), Maury Wills(1), Manny Mota(1)
 3-3 SF  N( 0-0) @ CIN N( 3-3)  4-17-1970    Pete Rose(1), Tony Perez(1), Hal McRae(1)
 3-3 SF  N( 1-1) @ CIN N( 2-2)  9-26-1971    Bobby Bonds(1), Pete Rose(1), Tony Perez(1)
 3-3 STL N( 1-1) @ CIN N( 2-2)  6-13-1976(2) Don Kessinger(1), Pete Rose(1), Tony Perez(1)
 3-3 CIN N( 2-2) @ ATL N( 1-1)  7- 6-1977    Pete Rose(1), Ken Griffey(1), Gary Matthews(1)
 3-3 OAK A( 2-2) @ BOS A( 1-1)  8-30-1982    Tony Armas(1), Dave McKay(1), Tony Perez(1)
RBIs:
11-2 PHI A( 0-0) @ CLE A(11-2)  6-18-1950(2) Ray Boone(5), Jim Hegan(6)
10-4 CLE A( 5-2) @ KC  A( 5-2)  5-21-1977    Hal McRae(4), Buddy Bell(4), Fred Kendall(1), John Wathan(1)

There were 13 other games in which four different fathers had at least one RBI.
Walks:
 8-4 CHI N( 2-1) @ SF  N( 6-3)  8-25-1974    Don Kessinger(2), Bobby Bonds(1), Gary Matthews(2), Chris Speier(3)
 7-4 SD  N( 2-1) @ SF  N( 5-3) 10- 2-1974    Bobby Bonds(1), Gary Matthews(3), Chris Speier(1), Fred Kendall(2)
 7-3 HOU N( 3-1) @ SF  N( 4-2)  5- 4-1975(2) Jose Cruz(3), Gary Matthews(1), Chris Speier(3)
 7-2 MON N( 7-2) @ CIN N( 0-0)  4-11-1984    Pete Rose(4), Tim Raines(3)

 5-5 SF  N( 2-2) @ CIN N( 3-3)  9-28-1974    Bobby Bonds(1), Gary Matthews(1), Pete Rose(1), Tony Perez(1), Ken Griffey(1)
 5-5 HOU N( 2-2) @ CIN N( 3-3)  7- 2-1976(1) Jose Cruz(1), Pete Rose(1), Ken Griffey(1), Tony Perez(1), Jerry DaVanon(1)
Strikeouts:
 9-3 DET A( 6-2) @ NY  A( 3-1)  8- 2-1990    Cecil Fielder(5), Gary Ward(1), Jesse Barfield(3)
 7-5 CIN N( 2-2) @ SF  N( 5-3)  9-21-1974    Tony Perez(1), Bobby Bonds(2), Gary Matthews(1), Chris Speier(2), Ken Griffey(1)
 7-4 BOS A( 2-2) @ NY  A( 5-2)  9-22-1990    Jesse Barfield(3), Tony Pena(1), Wayne Tolleson(2), Kevin Romine(1)
 7-3 DET A( 4-2) @ NY  A( 3-1) 10- 1-1990    Cecil Fielder(3), Gary Ward(1), Jesse Barfield(3)

 6-5 CIN N( 3-3) @ SF  N( 3-2)  9-22-1974    Pete Rose(1), Gary Matthews(2), Tony Perez(1), Chris Speier(1), Ken Griffey(1)

And shifting over to the pitchers:

Innings pitched:
17.1-2 STL N(8.1-1) @ PHI N(9-1)   7-14-1949    Max Lanier(8.1), Ken Heintzelman(9)
16.1-2 STL N(7.1-1) @ PHI N(9-1)   6-14-1950    Ken Heintzelman(7.1), Max Lanier(9)
16  -1 CHI A(16-1) @ PHI A(0-0)    7-11-1908    Ed Walsh(16)
16  -1 PHI A(0-0) @ CHI A(16-1)    8- 4-1910    Ed Walsh(16)

 8.1-3 BOS A(3.1-2) @ OAK A(5-1)   7-15-1968    Dick Ellsworth(5), Diego Segui(.1), Ed Sprague(3)
 6  -3 STL N(3.2-2) @ CIN N(2.1-1) 6-12-1973    Pedro Borbon(1.2), Ed Sprague(2), Diego Segui(2.1)
 6  -3 KC  A(3-2) @ DET A(3-1)     5- 4-1993    Mark Leiter(1.2), Tom Gordon(3), Dave Johnson(1.1)
Hits allowed:
17-2 PIT N( 8-1) @ CHI N( 9-1)  8-19-1966    Dick Ellsworth(8), Vern Law(9)
17-2 NY  A( 6-1) @ BOS A(11-1)  5-16-1968    Dick Ellsworth(6), Mel Stottlemyre(11)

 5-3 STL N( 3-2) @ CIN N( 2-1)  6-12-1973    Pedro Borbon(2), Ed Sprague(1), Diego Segui(2)
Walks:
11-1 NY  N( 0-0) @ STL N(11-1)  7-17-1952    Max Lanier(11)
11-2 NY  A( 5-1) @ BOS A( 6-1)  5-16-1968    Dick Ellsworth(5), Mel Stottlemyre(6)
11-1 WAS A(11-1) @ NY  A( 0-0)  5-21-1970    Mel Stottlemyre(11)

 4-3 STL N( 3-2) @ CIN N( 1-1)  6-12-1973    Pedro Borbon(1), Ed Sprague(2), Diego Segui(1)
Strikeouts:
15-1 CHI A(15-1) @ CLE A( 0-0) 10- 2-1908    Ed Walsh(15)
15-1 BOS A( 0-0) @ CHI A(15-1)  8-11-1910    Ed Walsh(15)
14-2 DET A( 4-1) @ BAL A(10-1) 10- 5-1991    Dave Johnson(4), Mark Leiter(10)

 5-3 BOS A( 2-2) @ OAK A( 3-1)  7-15-1968    Dick Ellsworth(3), Diego Segui(1), Ed Sprague(1)
10-3 KC  A( 5-2) @ DET A( 5-1)  5- 4-1993    Mark Leiter(3), Tom Gordon(5), Dave Johnson(2)

Now I expect that this has probably gone on far too long already, but I thought I'd take quick look at grandsons before we go. Here are the first ten grandsons of major leaguers to appear in a game:

   Date       Grandson                 Grandfather
 8-25-1946(2) Lee Possehl              George Rooks
 9- 1-1967    Ed Herrmann              Marty Herrmann
 9- 7-1968    Jim Spencer              Ben Spencer
 5-17-1972    Bob Gallagher            Shano Collins
 9-16-1983    Dennis Rasmussen         Bill Brubaker
 4-11-1987    Matt Williams            Bert Griffith
 4-12-1989    Matt Merullo             Lennie Merullo
 8-19-1992    Bret Boone               Ray Boone
 9- 8-1993    Roger Salkeld            Bill Salkeld
 5- 3-1995    David Bell               Gus Bell

Here are the number of third generation major leaguers each year since 1940:

        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
194x    0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   0
195x    0   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
196x    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   2
197x    2   2   3   3   3   3   2   2   2   1
198x    1   1   1   1   1   1   1   2   2   3
199x    2   3   4   5   4   5   5   5   7   6
200x    7   6   7   7   7   6   4   5   4   5
201x    6   6   6   7   7   4   5   7   4

And here's a chronology of the record for the most grandsons of major leaguers to appear in a game.

1 PHI N(1) @ CIN N(0)  8-25-1946(2) Lou Possehl
2 CHI A(1) @ CAL A(1)  6-20-1969(2) Ed Herrmann, Jim Spencer
3 CIN N(2) @ SF  N(1)  5- 4-1996    Bret Boone, Roger Salkeld, Matt Williams
3 MIA N(2) @ WAS N(1)  9-17-2015    Derek Dietrich, Jarred Cosart, Jayson Werth

Three grandsons have appeared in a major league game 41 times. The first and last are shown above. No one team has fielded more than two grandsons of major leaguers in a game, since no team has ever had more than two on their roster.

Note: our data on relatives does not presume to be complete, and while I suspect we are missing very few father-son relationships, we are probably missing more of the others.

Having said that, let's look at the first ten grandfathers. This time around, we're not going to require that the grandson be born by game-time (since that's never happened). Here are the first ten grandpas:

   Date       Grandfather              Grandson
 5-12-1891    George Rooks             Lee Possehl
 4-21-1910    Shano Collins            Bob Gallagher
 9- 8-1913    Ben Spencer              Jim Spencer
 7-10-1918(1) Marty Herrmann           Ed Herrmann
 4-13-1922    Bert Griffith            Matt Williams
 9- 8-1932    Bill Brubaker            Dennis Rasmussen
 9- 7-1935(2) Bobby Estalella          Bobby Estalella
 9-15-1935    Sam Narron               Sam Narron
 9- 2-1937    Red Barkley              Brian Barkley
 9-12-1941    Lennie Merullo           Matt Merullo

The number of grandfathers of future major leaguers each year since 1890:

        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
189x    0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
190x    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
191x    1   1   1   2   1   1   1   1   2   1
192x    1   1   2   2   2   1   0   0   0   0
193x    0   0   1   1   1   3   2   2   1   3
194x    1   2   4   6   3   4   4   5   5   5
195x    6   6   4   6   6   6   4   4   4   6
196x    6   3   3   3   3   3   3   3   2   2
197x    3   3   2   2   1   1   1   1   1   1
198x    1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

The last grandfather to appear in a game prior to 2019 was Lee May (grandfather of Jacob May) in 1982, but Carl Yastrzemski extended that to 1983 this year when his grandson Mike Yastrzemski joined the Giants.

And here's a chronology of the record for the most grandfathers of major leaguers to appear in a game.

1 CHI A(1) @ STL A(0)  4-21-1910    Shano Collins
2 CHI A(1) @ WAS A(1)  9-13-1913    Shano Collins, Ben Spencer
3 CLE A(1) @ PHI A(2)  8- 7-1949(2) Ray Boone, Bobby Estalella, Joe Coleman
3 CIN N(1) @ MIL N(2)  4-20-1960    Gus Bell, Lew Burdette, Ray Boone
3 MIL N(2) @ PIT N(1)  4- 9-1963    Lew Burdette, Dick Schofield, Gus Bell

I've shown all three times that three future grandfathers of major league players appeared in the same game.

Now a man wiser than me would cease and desist at this point, but please bear with me for just a few more lists about... nephews. With the caveat that our data on uncle and nephews is probably not complete, here are the first ten nephews to appear in the major leagues:

   Date       Nephew                   Uncle      
 4-25-1901    Bill Hallman             Bill Hallman
 9- 1-1902    Johnny Evers             Tom Evers
 9-27-1902    Jesse Whiting            Ed Whiting
 8-15-1908    Queenie O'Rourke         John O'Rourke
 4-25-1910    Hugh Bradley             Foghorn Bradley
 4-24-1913    Joe Evers                Tom Evers
 7-17-1914    George McAvoy            Scoops Carey
 8-18-1915    High Pockets Kelly       Bill Lange
 4-20-1921    Tex Jeanes               Tris Speaker
 9-18-1923(1) Ren Kelly                Bill Lange

Bill Hallman's entry above was the first AL game played by Milwaukee and Detroit. Hallman's Brewers led 13-4 heading into the bottom of the 9th only to lose 14-13.

Here are the number of nephews each year since 1900:

        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
190x    0   1   2   2   1   1   3   3   2   1
191x    2   2   2   2   3   3   2   2   0   1
192x    1   2   3   2   1   2   2   3   2   2
193x    1   1   1   2   2   1   1   1   2   2
194x    5   5   3   6   4   3   5   4   4   5
195x    4   4   5   4   5   6   5   5   3   2
196x    1   2   2   1   1   1   2   2   0   3
197x    2   3   3   3   3   3   5   6   5   7
198x    8   9   8  11   9   9   9   8   8   7
199x   10   8   9   8   9  10   8  11  15  15
200x   16  17  19  20  21  21  20  20  22  20
201x   18  18  15  17  19  15  13  13  14

And here's a chronology of the record for the most nephews to appear in a game.

1 MIL A(1) @ DET A(0)  4-25-1901    Bill Hallman
2 PIT N(1) @ CHI N(1)  9-16-1906    Bill Hallman, Johnny Evers
3 CHI A(1) @ WAS A(2)  6-11-1950(1) Chico Carrasquel, Sam Mele, Sherry Robertson
4 MON N(2) @ STL N(2)  4-25-1992    Ray Lankford, Gerald Perry, Moises Alou, Mel Rojas
5 ATL N(2) @ FLA N(3)  4-12-2002    Gary Sheffield, Kevin Millar, Derrek Lee, Charles Johnson, Wes Helms
5 ATL N(2) @ FLA N(3)  7-24-2002    Gary Sheffield, Wes Helms, Kevin Millar, Derrek Lee, Charles Johnson
5 FLA N(3) @ ATL N(2)  9-20-2002    Kevin Millar, Derrek Lee, Charles Johnson, Gary Sheffield, Wes Helms
5 PIT N(4) @ MIL N(1)  9-27-2011    Josh Harrison, Derrek Lee, Neil Walker, Matt Pagnozzi, Jerry Hairston
5 PIT N(2) @ LA  N(3)  4-11-2012    Neil Walker, Clint Barmes, Jerry Hairston, Juan Uribe, Tony Gwynn
5 PIT N(3) @ LA  N(2)  4-12-2012    Josh Harrison, Clint Barmes, Juan Uribe, Neil Walker, Tony Gwynn
5 PIT N(3) @ WAS N(2)  7-24-2013    Neil Walker, Clint Barmes, Scott Hairston, Jayson Werth, Josh Harrison
5 PIT N(3) @ WAS N(2)  7-25-2013    Josh Harrison, Clint Barmes, Jayson Werth, Neil Walker, Scott Hairston
5 WAS N(2) @ PIT N(3)  5-23-2014    Jayson Werth, Josh Harrison, Neil Walker, Clint Barmes, Scott Hairston

I have shown all nine times that five nephews of former major leaguers have appeared in the same game. Four nephews have appeared in a game for the same team 27 times.

Well, I think I'll spare you an investigation into cousins and sons-in-law and so on.

Hopefully some of this was of general interest and thanks for your patience.

Extra-Inning Single Game Batting Records

A while back on SABR-L, Dennis Dillon was wondering if Rocky Colavito held the record with his 5 extra-inning hits on June 24, 1962. My answer was "probably" after looking through Retrosheet's collection of play-by-play games. This collection is currently complete (at least when we include deduced games) back to 1934 (155,986 games) and also includes 79% (14,545 of 18,370) of the games from 1919 to 1933.

So here are the leaders in extra-inning game performances in a couple of statistical categories:

At-bats:

 AB Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  8 Dave Stegman          CHI A  5- 8-1984     8   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   5   0   0
  7 Rowdy Elliott         BRO N  5- 1-1920     7   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0
  7 Leon Cadore           BRO N  5- 1-1920     7   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0
  7 Tony Boeckel          BOS N  5- 1-1920     7   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
  7 Doc Cramer            DET A  7-21-1945     7   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   1   0   0
  7 Bob Maier             DET A  7-21-1945     7   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
  7 Irv Hall              PHI A  7-21-1945     7   0   2   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   1   0   0
  7 Ted Sizemore          STL N  9-11-1974     7   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0
  7 John Milner           NY  N  9-11-1974     7   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   0   2   0   0
  7 Wayne Garrett         NY  N  9-11-1974     7   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0
  7 Dave Schneck          NY  N  9-11-1974     7   0   2   2   0   0   0   4   0   0   0   3   0   0
  7 Jim Gantner           MIL A  5- 8-1984     7   0   2   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   1   0   0
  7 Harold Baines         CHI A  5- 8-1984     7   1   2   1   0   1   1   6   1   0   0   0   0   0
  7 Cecil Cooper          MIL A  5- 8-1984     7   1   2   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   1   0   0
  7 Julio Cruz            CHI A  5- 8-1984     7   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
  7 Carlton Fisk          CHI A  5- 8-1984     7   1   3   1   0   0   1   4   0   0   0   2   0   0

All of the entries on this list played in one of only four games, the shortest one lasting 24 innings.

Runs:

  R Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  3 Stan Hack             CHI N  8- 9-1942(1)  3   3   3   1   0   0   1   4   2   0   0   0   0   0
  3 Howard Johnson        NY  N  7- 4-1985     4   3   2   0   0   1   2   5   1   1   0   1   0   0
200 players with 2

For the most part, scoring three runs in an extra-inning game requires having a team score in three different innings (as both teams above did), which in turn, requires that the home team team match the number of runs scored by the visitors in the first two of these. In the games we looked at, a team required three (or four) non-scoreless extra-innings to settle the contest on 35 occasions. Here's the breakdown of the number of runs scored in each of those matched innings:

  1 -  57
  2 -  12
  3 -   3
Tot -  72

The one game in which teams continued to play on after scoring in three extra-innings was the one played on September 10, 1974, between the White Sox and Twins. That 15-inning contest saw five scoreless half-innings and seven in which a team scored a single run.

The last time there were three different extra-innings with runs scored was the game on April 10, 2015 between the Red Sox and Yankees. Again, each of those innings featured just a single run scored.

In our collection of games, both teams have scored five runs in an extra-inning once and a matching four runs in an inning on four other occasions:

Runs Inn     Teams          Game
   5  14 CHI A @ SEA A   6- 5-2013
   4  10 TOR A @ NY  A   9-17-1980
   4  10 SD  N @ ATL N   5-23-1991
   4  10 DET A @ CHI A   9-18-2004
   4  13 OAK A @ NY  A   9-22-2012

And here are games where a visiting team scored four or more runs in an extra-inning only to lose in the bottom half:

 Top Bot Inn     Teams          Game
   5   6  11 CHI N @ PIT N   4-21-1991
   5   6  10 LA  N @ ARI N   9-27-2011
   4   5  10 PIT N @ PHI N   9-16-1930
   4   5  10 NY  N @ CHI N   8-31-1932
   4   5  10 DET A @ STL A   7- 3-1938
   4   5  10 CIN N @ BRO N   7-22-1952
   4   5  11 PIT N @ PHI N   5- 6-1966
   4   5  12 HOU N @ SD  N   7- 5-1969
   4   5  10 FLA N @ ATL N   9-17-2006
Hits:

  H Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  5 Rocky Colavito        DET A  6-24-1962     6   0   5   0   1   0   0   7   0   0   0   0   0   0
  4 Sam Chapman           PHI A  5-28-1941     4   1   4   1   0   0   1   5   0   0   0   0   1   0
  4 Eddie Waitkus         PHI N  9-15-1950(2)  5   1   4   2   0   0   0   6   0   0   0   0   0   0
  4 Mike Heath            OAK A  7- 1-1979     4   0   4   1   0   0   1   5   0   0   0   0   0   0
  4 Tom Paciorek          CHI A  5- 8-1984     6   0   4   0   0   0   2   4   1   1   0   2   0   0
  4 Brant Brown           CHI N  6-22-1996     4   1   4   1   0   1   2   8   0   0   0   0   1   1
  4 Alex Rios             CHI A  6- 5-2013     5   1   4   0   0   0   2   4   0   0   0   0   0   0
  4 Xander Bogaerts       BOS A  4-10-2015     4   1   4   0   0   0   0   4   1   0   0   0   1   0
137 players with 3

In case you're wondering, when Johnny Burnett had nine hits in the Indians' historic 18-17 18-inning loss to the Athletics in 1932, he already had six of them before the game went into overtime. Colavito finished his game with seven hits, the first batter with that many in a game since Burnett. It has happened three times since, once in a nine-inning game.

Four of these players (Chapman, Heath, Rios, and Bogaerts) were hitless in regulation. Prior to the 10th inning, the players on the list above were a collective 5-32.

Doubles:

 2B Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  3 Kiki Cuyler           CHI N  9- 8-1928     3   0   3   3   0   0   1   6   0   0   0   0   0   0
 71 players with 2

Cuyler's last double drove home the winning run in the bottom of the 14th.

Triples:

 3B Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  2 Harry Simpson         CLE A  5- 1-1952     2   0   2   0   2   0   0   6   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Herm Winningham       CIN N  8-15-1990     2   1   2   0   2   0   1   6   0   0   0   0   0   0
1551 players with 1

In his game, Herm Winningham had already hit a double and triple in regulation and his three triples would have been the most in game in over nine years, had not Shawon Dunston done it two and a half weeks earlier.

Neither of Simpson's triples resulted in a run (he was picked off of third following his last one) as the Indians lost to the Senators when Frank Campos singled in the winning run in the bottom of the 13th. Campos was in his second year with Washington after a brief trial the previous September, and entered the game with a .404 career batting average (19-47). His five hitless prior at-bats that day were a glimpse of things to come, however, as he would hit only .220 (with a .523 OPS) over the remainder of his short career. In his 71 major league games, he had as many hit by pitches (two) as walks, The next non-pitcher with a career as long as his without having more walks than HBPs is Joe Cannon, who played from 1977 to 1980 and had one of each. And the only two players with more than 1000 at-bats and more HBPs than walks are Jay Faatz who played from 1884 to 1890, and Whitey Alpermann who was with Brooklyn from 1906 to 1909.

Alpermann is also the last player with 1000 career at-bats and more triples than walks. But I digress.

Home Runs:

 HR Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  2 Vern Stephens         STL A  9-29-1943(1)  2   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Willie Kirkland       CLE A  6-14-1963(2)  4   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Art Shamsky           CIN N  8-12-1966     2   2   2   0   0   2   3   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Ralph Garr            ATL N  5-17-1971     2   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Mike Young            BAL A  5-28-1987     2   2   2   0   0   2   3   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 John Mayberry         PHI N  6- 4-2013     2   2   2   0   0   2   5   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Matt Adams            STL N  9- 4-2013     3   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Curtis Granderson     NY  N  9-17-2016     2   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  2 Chris Davis           BAL A  5-16-2017     2   2   2   0   0   2   3   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
5199 players with 1

Art Shamsky didn't enter his game until the top of the 8th inning but he is still the only player on the list above to have three home runs in their game. He is also the only player on the list whose team lost, his two extra-inning homers merely re-tying the game, keeping things going until the Pirates could score three runs and win in the 13th. The two teams combined to hit 13 home runs in the game.

RBIs:

RBI Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  5 Clyde Vollmer         BOS A  7-28-1951     4   1   3   1   0   1   5   7   0   0   0   0   0   0
  5 John Mayberry         PHI N  6- 4-2013     2   2   2   0   0   2   5   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
207 players with 4

Clyde Vollmer's RBIs came via a 15th inning single (to re-tie the score) and a 16th inning game-ending grand-slam. Both hits came off of Bob Feller, who was making his only relief appearance of the year. It would be one of only two relief outings he would make from 1950 to 1954. His other, the year before, was also against Boston, also resulted in a loss, and featured another Vollmer RBI.

John Mayberry's big day also culminated in a game-ending grand-slam homer, coming after he'd led off the inning before with a home run to extend the game.

Total Bases:

 TB Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  8 Vern Stephens         STL A  9-29-1943(1)  2   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Harry Simpson         KC  A  6-12-1956     3   2   3   0   1   1   4   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Willie Kirkland       CLE A  6-14-1963(2)  4   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Art Shamsky           CIN N  8-12-1966     2   2   2   0   0   2   3   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Ralph Garr            ATL N  5-17-1971     2   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Mike Young            BAL A  5-28-1987     2   2   2   0   0   2   3   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Brant Brown           CHI N  6-22-1996     4   1   4   1   0   1   2   8   0   0   0   0   1   1
  8 John Mayberry         PHI N  6- 4-2013     2   2   2   0   0   2   5   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Matt Adams            STL N  9- 4-2013     3   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Curtis Granderson     NY  N  9-17-2016     2   2   2   0   0   2   2   8   0   0   0   0   0   0
  8 Chris Davis           BAL A  5-16-2017     2   2   2   0   0   2   3   8   0   0   0   0   0   0

We've seen all of these games on lists above with the exception of Harry Simpsons's, which featured his bases-loaded triple in a six-run 15th inning. Simpson played for the Athletics from 1955 to 1959, but 1956 was his only full year with the team, one which saw him tie for the league lead in triples and appear in the All-Star game. After coming there from the Indians in May of 1955, he was called up to the Yankees as part of Billy Martin's exile in June 1957, sent back down to the Kansas City a year later only to be dispatched to the White Sox in early 1959.

Walks:

 BB Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  4 Ted Kluszewski        CIN N  9- 7-1951     1   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   4   4   0   0   0   0
  4 Dick Allen            CHI A  8-10-1972     0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   1   0   0   1   1
  4 Derrek Lee            FLA N  6-10-2002     0   2   0   0   0   0   1   0   4   0   0   0   1   0
  4 Adam Dunn             CHI A  6- 5-2013     1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   3   0   0   0   0
  4 Melky Cabrera         TOR A  8-10-2014     1   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   4   2   0   0   0   0
 71 players with 3

After being intentionally walked for the 4th time, Kluszewski ended the 15th inning by getting hit by a batted ball. At the time, he wasn't the power hitter he would later become, finishing 1951 with only 13 homers in 607 at-bats. He would hit 16 in 1952 before turning into the Klu we remember, hitting 40, 49, 47 and 35 in the following four years.

Derrek Lee had homered in his two plate appearances prior to his game going into extra-innings, so the Royals pitched very carefully to him the rest of the way. His last walk came with the bases loaded, forcing home the fourth of the seven runs the Marlins would score in the top of the 14th.

Intentional Walks:

IBB Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  4 Ted Kluszewski        CIN N  9- 7-1951     1   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   4   4   0   0   0   0
  3 Eddie Miller          BOS N  7- 5-1940     2   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   1   0   0
  3 Larry Doby            CLE A  7- 1-1952     2   0   1   1   0   0   0   2   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Jim Wynn              HOU N  7-11-1970     0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Claudell Washington   NY  N  8-26-1980     2   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   1   0   0
  3 Terry Kennedy         SD  N  9-13-1982     1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Andre Dawson          CHI N  5-22-1990     1   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   3   3   0   0   1   0
  3 Paul Molitor          MIL A  5- 1-1991     2   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Vince Coleman         NY  N  8-10-1992     1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Jeff Bagwell          HOU N  5-21-1997     0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   0   1   0
  3 Manny Ramirez         BOS A  6- 5-2001     1   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Mike Lowell           FLA N  4-27-2003     2   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Rafael Palmeiro       BAL A  7- 2-2004     1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Ryan Howard           PHI N  8-11-2006     0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   0   0   0   0
  3 Adam Dunn             CHI A  6- 5-2013     1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   3   0   0   0   0

Dawson's three extra-inning intentional walks were part of a record-setting five he received in that game. A free-swinger throughout his career, half of his 42 walks that year were intentional.

Intentional walks are often a common strategy for the visiting team to use when a single run will end a game. In Kluszewski's game above, for example, the Reds received six intentional walks in extra-innings. The first visiting player to draw as many as three extra-inning intentional walks in the games we have was Terry Kennedy in 1982. While he was the Padres cleanup hitter, by the time the game reached the tenth inning, he was followed by the pitcher's spot in the batting order. A visiting player wouldn't get three intentional passes in extra-innings again until Rafael Palmeiro in 2004.

Hit By Pitches:

HBP Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  2 Cookie Rojas          PHI N  9-23-1966     0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0
  2 Phil Roof             KC  A  6- 2-1967     0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0
  2 Augie Ojeda           CHI N  5-28-2001     0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0
  2 Miguel Olivo          KC  A  5- 2-2009     0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0
1794 players with 1

Cookie Rojas was only hit by two other pitches in 1966 (out of 679 plate appearances).

Strikeouts:

 SO Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  5 Dave Stegman          CHI A  5- 8-1984     8   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   5   0   0
  4 Ernie Koy             BRO N  6-27-1939     6   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   0   0
  4 Sandy Valdespino      MIN A  8- 9-1967     5   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   4   0   0
  4 Graig Nettles         MIN A  7-19-1969     4   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   0   0
  4 Don Mincher           SEA A  7-27-1969     5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   0   0
  4 Roy Smalley           MIN A  8-28-1976     4   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   0   0
  4 Adam Rosales          OAK A  6-13-2013     4   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   0   0
  4 Mike Napoli           BOS A  4-10-2015     5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   4   0   0
113 players with 3

Neither Dave Stegman, Sandy Valdespino, Graig Nettles, or Adam Rosales started the games above. And Stegman, Valdespino and Smalley all finished their games with five strikeouts apiece.

Stolen Bases:

 SB Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  4 Luis Polonia          CAL A  6-10-1992     2   0   2   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   0   4   0
  3 Eddie Miksis          BRO N  5-17-1949     2   1   2   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   0   3   0
  3 Rich Amaral           SEA A  7-30-1998     4   1   3   0   0   0   0   3   0   0   0   0   3   0
  3 Carlos Beltran        STL N  8-19-2012     3   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   1   0   0   0   3   0
132 players with 2

The only runner on the list above to score as a result of his stolen bases was Eddie Miksis, who singled after Roy Campanella's home run with one out in the top of the 11th had given the Dodgers a 5-2 lead. His run (which came after his steal of second and third) turned out to matter when the Cubs came back to score three time in the bottom half. Those were his only stolen bases of the season.

And the Dodgers were the only team of the four above to win their game.

Caught Stealing:

 CS Player                 Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  2 Alex Kampouris        CIN N  4-21-1935     2   0   2   0   0   0   1   2   0   0   0   0   0   2
  2 Mickey Vernon         WAS A  6- 8-1947(1)  2   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   2
  2 Sheldon Mallory       OAK A  5-17-1977     2   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   2
  2 Dave Parker           PIT N  7- 6-1980     2   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   0   2
  2 Bip Roberts           SD  N  9-28-1988     1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   2
  2 Brad Ausmus           DET A  6-12-1999     0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   0   2
  2 Jose Tabata           PIT N  8-19-2012     4   1   1   1   0   0   0   2   1   0   0   0   0   2
2152 players with 1

Alex Kampouris was caught stealing to end the 10th and 12th inning, the second time after his team had already scored four runs. Rookie Sheldon Mallory was the only player on the list above to risk a third extra-inning caught stealing, when he set off for second base in the 14th after having been previously thrown out in the 10th and 12th. He was successful this time, but was left stranded.

I thought I might follow those up with similar lists for teams.

At-bats:

 AB  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
 61 CHI A  5- 8-1984    61   4  17   3   0   1   4  23   3   2   0  10   0   0
 58 NY  N  9-11-1974    58   0  11   2   0   0   0  13   7   4   0  10   0   0
 56 STL N  9-11-1974    56   1  13   0   0   0   0  13   4   3   1   7   1   1
 54 BRO N  5- 1-1920    54   0   4   0   0   0   0   4   1   0   0   4   1   0
 54 BOS N  5- 1-1920    54   0   4   0   0   0   0   4   3   0   0   5   0   0
 53 MIL A  5- 8-1984    53   3  14   1   0   1   3  18   5   1   0   9   1   2
 51 DET A  7-21-1945    51   0   7   1   0   0   0   8   6   0   0   5   0   1
 51 PHI A  7-21-1945    51   0   9   0   0   0   0   9   3   0   0   4   0   0
 51 HOU N  4-15-1968    51   1  10   0   0   0   1  10   7   4   0  12   0   2
 50 NY  A  6-24-1962    50   2  10   1   0   1   2  14   2   1   0  10   1   0

The same four games that dominated the player list occupy the top eight slots here as well. I was struck by how similar the two teams' lines for the record-setting 26-inning game in 1920 was, only differing by two walks and a single strike out and stolen base.

Runs:

  R  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
 12 TEX A  7- 3-1983    29  12  12   3   1   0  10  17   7   2   0   2   0   0
 11 NY  A  7-26-1928(1) 19  11  12   4   1   0  11  18   2   1   0   1   0   0
 11 MIN A  6-21-1969    12  11   8   0   0   1   8  11   4   0   0   1   1   0
 10 CIN N  5-15-1919    20  10   9   1   2   0  10  14   4   0   0   1   2   1
 10 SD  N  6-28-1994(2) 12  10   7   1   0   0   6   8   2   1   3   1   0   0
  9 CHI N  7-23-1923    18   9   8   1   1   0   7  11   3   0   0   0   0   0
  9 NY  N  6-15-1929    24   9  11   4   1   0   9  17   3   1   0   3   0   0
  9 CLE A  8- 5-1933(1) 20   9   8   1   0   0   9   9   3   0   0   0   1   0
  9 NY  N  5-30-1940(2) 20   9  11   1   0   1   9  15   1   1   0   1   0   0
  9 CIN N  8-24-1947(1) 11   9   8   1   0   0   9   9   2   0   0   0   0   0
  9 BOS A  7- 8-1973(2) 10   9   8   2   0   1   9  13   2   1   0   0   0   0
  9 SD  N  5-28-1995     8   9   6   1   0   0   8   7   5   1   0   0   1   0
  9 FLA N  6-10-2002    20   9   7   1   0   0   9   8  11   3   0   1   2   0
  9 ANA A  8-16-2009    21   9  11   1   0   1   9  15   3   0   1   2   1   0

It's probably not too surprising that all of the entries on this list are visiting teams. All but four of these entries were the result of the scoring in a single inning.

From this list, you can create a chronology of the record for the most runs in an extra-inning. It was tied at ten by the Reds in 1919, extended to eleven by the Yankees in 1928, tied by Twins in 1969, before the 1983 Rangers set the current mark with twelve.

The record the Reds had tied had been previously set on July 21st, 1886 by the Kansas City Cowboys, and on June 17th, 1887 by the Boston Beaneaters. The Cowboys' victory that day in 1886 was quite an upset: they'd started that day with a 13-42 record and beat a Detroit team who came in with a 48-13 mark. Kansas City had lost eight straight before that win and would lose another six after it. Detroit's loss would be their only one in a sixteen-game span. 1886 would be the Kansas City franchise's only year in the National League, but at least they departed with a record that would stand for 42 years.

In both the 1919 and 1928 games, the opposing pitcher (and starter) was left in to take the entire beating. Al Mamaux, the Reds opponent, had battled Hod Eller to a scoreless draw until blowing up in the thirteenth (nine of the runs were unearned), and Detroit rookie Vic Sorrell saw a pretty good game (one run through eleven) go horribly wrong in the final frame against the Yankees.

For Steve Kealey, who was on the mound for the last seven runs of the 1973 Red Sox game, as well as Ben Callahan, who suffered through the last nine runs of the record-setting Rangers game, those would be their last major league appearances.

Before we move on, here are the most runs scored by a home team in our extra-inning games:

  R  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  6 BOS A  7-28-1951    24   6   9   4   0   1   6  16   6   2   0   2   0   0
  6 SD  N  7- 5-1969    16   6  11   2   0   0   5  13   1   1   0   2   0   0
  6 PIT N  4-21-1991     9   6   6   3   0   0   6   9   4   1   0   2   0   0
  6 ARI N  9-27-2011     6   6   3   0   0   1   5   6   2   0   0   0   0   0

Three of these games appeared on an earlier list of teams that had scored four or five runs in the top of an extra-inning only to lose in the bottom. The other is the product of two visiting team runs and a game-ending grand-slam.

Hits:

  H  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
 17 CHI A  5- 8-1984    61   4  17   3   0   1   4  23   3   2   0  10   0   0
 14 MIL A  5- 8-1984    53   3  14   1   0   1   3  18   5   1   0   9   1   2
 13 NY  N  7-16-1920    35   7  13   1   3   0   7  20   1   0   0   1   0   0
 13 KC  A  6-17-1967(2) 41   2  13   1   0   1   1  17   3   0   0   4   1   1
 13 STL N  9-11-1974    56   1  13   0   0   0   0  13   4   3   1   7   1   1
 13 NY  N  4-19-1976    33   1  13   0   0   1   1  16   1   1   0   2   0   0
 13 CHI A  6- 5-2013    32   7  13   2   0   0   7  15   7   4   0   8   2   0
 12 NY  A  7-26-1928(1) 19  11  12   4   1   0  11  18   2   1   0   1   0   0
 12 CIN N  9- 7-1951    34   4  12   4   0   0   4  16   8   6   0   2   0   0
 12 TEX A  7- 3-1983    29  12  12   3   1   0  10  17   7   2   0   2   0   0
 12 LA  N  8-23-1989    49   1  12   1   0   1   1  16   0   0   0  10   1   1
 12 BOS A  9-15-2017    31   8  12   3   0   0   7  15   3   2   1   6   0   0

Once again, visiting teams dominate this list, even though several of the entries come from long games with little scoring. One seemingly high-scoring game, the 1920 Giants game, was scoreless for 16 innings before they exploded for seven runs and eight hits, including back-to-back-to-back triples, against what we can assume was a tiring Earl Hamilton. He had a three-hitter through the first ten innings, but much of his earlier dominance was overshadowed by the ending.

The 1967 A's game took 19 innings to conclude, thanks to a Dave Duncan home run. It was the first (and only) win in Bill Edgerton's major league, but it was also the first career loss for future Cy Young Award winner Mike Marshall.

Doubles:

 2B  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  5 BOS A  9- 5-1927(1) 31   4   7   5   0   0   4  12   1   0   0   4   0   0
  5 ARI N  6- 7-2009    33   3   8   5   0   1   3  16   6   4   0   9   0   0
  4 NY  A  7-26-1928(1) 19  11  12   4   1   0  11  18   2   1   0   1   0   0
  4 NY  N  6-15-1929    24   9  11   4   1   0   9  17   3   1   0   3   0   0
  4 STL A  5-12-1934(1) 28   1   6   4   0   0   1  10   4   1   0   8   0   1
  4 BRO N  5- 8-1935     9   1   5   4   0   0   1   9   2   1   0   1   0   0
  4 NY  A  8-11-1937(1) 20   4   5   4   0   0   3   9   5   1   0   7   0   0
  4 BOS A  7-28-1951    24   6   9   4   0   1   6  16   6   2   0   2   0   0
  4 CIN N  9- 7-1951    34   4  12   4   0   0   4  16   8   6   0   2   0   0
  4 CAL A  4-20-1984    17   5   7   4   0   0   5  11   3   1   0   2   1   0
  4 SF  N  9-28-1986    32   3  11   4   0   0   3  15   7   4   0   2   1   0
  4 ARI N  7- 8-1999     9   3   5   4   0   0   3   9   1   1   0   2   0   0
  4 TEX A  4-16-2008    21   2   6   4   0   0   1  10   4   3   0   6   0   0
  4 PHI N  8-24-2013    33   0   6   4   0   0   0  10   5   3   0   9   0   0

The 1927 Red Sox game, tied for the top spot on this list, probably deserves an asterisk. Like other games of this era (and earlier), the high number of doubles was a result of a ground rule. Sometimes the rule was temporary, as in this case, when an overflow crowd spilled into the outfield and any batter hitting a ball into the fans there was credited with a cheap double. And sometimes the rule lasted for an entire season, as was the case with the Chicago White Stockings' home games in 1883, when any ball hit over the ridiculously short fence at Lake Front Park (196 feet down the right field line, 300 feet to center-field) was good for two-bases. On July 3rd of that year, Chicago hit 14 doubles, including four each by Cap Anson and Abner Dalrymple on their way to a 31-7 victory over Buffalo. (The ground rule there was worse the next year, when balls hit over that fence were home runs.)

Triples:

 3B  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  3 NY  N  7-16-1920    35   7  13   1   3   0   7  20   1   0   0   1   0   0
  3 PHI A  7-10-1931    19   2   5   1   3   0   2  12   1   0   0   1   0   0
 47 teams with 2

As I mentioned above, the three triples hit in the Giants game came in a seven-run 17th inning and were consecutive.

Home Runs:

 HR  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  4 MIN A  5- 2-1964    10   4   4   0   0   4   4  16   0   0   0   1   0   0
  4 MIL N  6- 8-1965     8   6   7   0   0   4   6  19   1   0   0   0   0   1
 16 teams with 3

Like the Giants triples, the four home runs hit by the 1964 Twins were consecutive. This was only the third time a team had hit four homers in a row, the first by the Braves in 1961 (a game they lost, by the way), and the second by the Indians in 1963. While the Braves the next year didn't quite duplicate the Twins' feat, they did homer in four consecutive at-bats, as the string was interrupted midway by a walk to Eddie Mathews.

RBIS:

RBI  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
 11 NY  A  7-26-1928(1) 19  11  12   4   1   0  11  18   2   1   0   1   0   0
 10 CIN N  5-15-1919    20  10   9   1   2   0  10  14   4   0   0   1   2   1
 10 TEX A  7- 3-1983    29  12  12   3   1   0  10  17   7   2   0   2   0   0
  9 NY  N  6-15-1929    24   9  11   4   1   0   9  17   3   1   0   3   0   0
  9 CLE A  8- 5-1933(1) 20   9   8   1   0   0   9   9   3   0   0   0   1   0
  9 NY  N  5-30-1940(2) 20   9  11   1   0   1   9  15   1   1   0   1   0   0
  9 CIN N  8-24-1947(1) 11   9   8   1   0   0   9   9   2   0   0   0   0   0
  9 BOS A  7- 8-1973(2) 10   9   8   2   0   1   9  13   2   1   0   0   0   0
  9 FLA N  6-10-2002    20   9   7   1   0   0   9   8  11   3   0   1   2   0
  9 ANA A  8-16-2009    21   9  11   1   0   1   9  15   3   0   1   2   1   0

Not a particularly interesting list, since it maps pretty closely to the data on team runs shown earlier, but I figured if I skipped it, someone would wonder why, so here it is.

Total Bases:

 TB  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
 23 CHI A  5- 8-1984    61   4  17   3   0   1   4  23   3   2   0  10   0   0
 20 NY  N  7-16-1920    35   7  13   1   3   0   7  20   1   0   0   1   0   0
 19 NY  A  7-20-1941    33   6  10   3   0   2   6  19   2   1   0   3   0   0
 19 BOS A  4-29-1951    20   6   8   0   1   3   6  19   3   0   0   1   0   0
 19 MIL N  6- 8-1965     8   6   7   0   0   4   6  19   1   0   0   0   0   1
 19 PIT N  8-19-2012    38   4  11   3   1   1   4  19   6   2   1   7   0   2
 18 NY  A  7-26-1928(1) 19  11  12   4   1   0  11  18   2   1   0   1   0   0
 18 SEA A  5-16-1969    12   6   6   1   1   3   6  18   1   0   0   1   0   0
 18 CIN N  6-29-1976    22   8   9   1   1   2   8  18   4   1   0   4   2   0
 18 MIL A  5- 8-1984    53   3  14   1   0   1   3  18   5   1   0   9   1   2
 18 HOU N  6-16-1995    30   5  10   2   0   2   5  18   1   0   0   7   2   0
 18 BAL A  7- 7-2014    13   6   8   1   0   3   6  18   0   0   0   1   0   0

In their 1941 game, the Yankees had collected only four singles through seven scoreless frames before erupting for six runs in the 17th, including three doubles and two homers, all but a leadoff homer coming with two out. And the 1951 Red Sox homered in three straight innings to help earn their place on the list, solo shots by Dom DiMaggio in the 11th and Tom Wright in the 12th (his first in the majors), before Ted Williams capped the team's four-run 13th inning with a two run blast.

We've seen the 2012 Pirates-Cards game on two earlier lists, one because of three stolen bases by the Cards' Carlos Beltran and the other due to Jose Tabata's two caught stealing. And it's nice to see the original Seattle Pilots make a list for something other than Don Mincher's four extra-inning strikeouts. This time they hit for the cycle, with two extra homers, while scoring six runs in the top of the 11th and then, in true expansion team fashion, giving up five in the bottom before John O'Donoghue struck out Carl Yastrzemski to ensure the victory.

Walks:

 BB  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
 13 MIN A  7-19-1969    30   5   6   3   0   0   4   9  13   2   0   9   2   0
 13 KC  A  6- 6-1991    28   1   8   1   0   0   0   9  13   6   0   2   1   0
 12 WAS A  9-14-1971(2) 36   3   4   0   0   0   2   4  12   1   0   4   3   0
 11 BOS N  7- 5-1940    36   0   7   3   0   0   0  10  11   6   0   4   0   0
 11 FLA N  6-10-2002    20   9   7   1   0   0   9   8  11   3   0   1   2   0
 11 FLA N  4-27-2003    32   0   4   1   0   0   0   5  11   3   0   9   1   0
 10 LA  A  6-25-1961    16   1   3   2   1   0   1   7  10   4   0   1   0   0
 12 teams with 9

The 13 extra-inning walks the Twins received in that 1969 contest were part of a record 19 they collected in the 18-inning game, tying the mark originally set in nine innings by Louisville on September 21st, 1887.

Well, that's one version. My out-of-date (2007) Sporting News Record book has Louisville's mark being broken on September, 17, 1920, when the Red Sox walked 20 times. But the official team dailies that day credit Boston with only 18 walks, matching the total of walks charged against the Tigers' pitchers. In addition, according to the same record book, the modern National League record was set by the Phillies in 16-innings on July 2, 2004 when they joined the Twins in the 19-walk club. But it looks like that might be a simple mistake on the Sporting News' part, since all other accounts give them 18 walks.

In the 1991 Royals game, the team had walked only once heading into overtime, and their place alongside the Twins at the top of this list is due in large part to Gerald Alexander, who managed to hold the Kansas City scoreless for over four innings despite walking eight batters (and allowing four hits). The game came to an end in the bottom of the 16th when Kenny Rogers gave up a single and a walk before his error on a sacrifice bunt to send everyone home.

Intentional Walks:

IBB  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  7 HOU N  7-15-1984    25   1   7   1   1   0   1  10   7   7   0   3   0   0
  6 CHI A  8-21-1933    30   2   8   0   0   0   2   8   7   6   0   2   0   1
  6 BOS N  7- 5-1940    36   0   7   3   0   0   0  10  11   6   0   4   0   0
  6 CIN N  9- 7-1951    34   4  12   4   0   0   4  16   8   6   0   2   0   0
  6 NY  N  5- 2-1956    28   1   6   2   0   0   1   8   9   6   0   5   0   0
  6 LA  N  4-24-1970    18   1   5   1   0   0   1   6   7   6   0   2   0   0
  6 NY  N  8-26-1980    32   0   6   2   0   0   0   8   7   6   0   9   0   0
  6 KC  A  6- 6-1991    28   1   8   1   0   0   0   9  13   6   0   2   1   0
 12 teams with 5

I mentioned earlier that intentionally walking batters is a strategy that make sense more often for visiting managers in extra-inning games. And noticing that only one of the teams on the list above (the 1956 Giants) were a visiting team, I decided to show some recent data to demonstrate what seemed to me a pretty obvious fact. But rather than present a huge table showing the year-by-year home and away extra-inning intentional walks, I figured that data from last year would suffice. So here it is:

Year   Away  Home
2018     62    60

So much for common sense. As it turns out, home teams are generally more likely than visiting teams to be passed in this manner, especially as you go back in time, but these days it's a very subtle difference indeed. Here's the breakdown by decade from 1934 to 2018:

Decade Away  Home   PctH
1930s   112   218   66.1
1940s   245   429   63.7
1950s   308   433   58.4
1960s   489   699   58.8
1970s   653   881   57.4
1980s   712   849   54.4
1990s   618   710   53.5
2000s   596   678   53.2
2010s   535   578   51.9

I'm sure there are very good reasons why the gap has been steadily narrowing over time, but in four of the past nine seasons, visiting teams have received more intentional walk than home teams.

Hit By Pitches:

HBP  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  4 TEX A  6- 8-2013    27   0   3   2   0   0   0   5   4   1   4   6   1   1
  3 CAL A  8-21-1968    19   0   2   0   0   0   0   2   5   1   3   3   0   1
  3 SD  N  6-28-1994(2) 12  10   7   1   0   0   6   8   2   1   3   1   0   0
  3 CHI N  5-28-2001    15   3   4   1   0   1   3   8   0   0   3   3   0   0
 77 teams with 2

Second-year reserve infielder Augie Ojeda entered the 2001 Cubs game as part of a double-switch in the sixth inning and ended up getting hit in both of his extra-inning appearances. It was the first two times he'd reached base that way in the major leagues.

Strikeouts:

 SO  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
 15 NY  N  4-15-1968    47   0   6   1   0   0   0   7   2   1   0  15   2   0
 14 NY  N  5-31-1964(2) 46   0   9   0   0   0   0   9   1   0   0  14   0   1
 14 SD  N  8-15-1980    41   0  10   0   0   0   0  10   6   3   0  14   4   0
 13 CAL A  7- 9-1971    38   0   5   0   0   0   0   5   1   0   0  13   0   0
 13 CHI A  8-10-1972    32   1   5   0   1   0   0   7   8   1   0  13   1   2
 13 HOU N  6- 3-1989    43   1   9   1   1   0   1  12   4   2   0  13   0   0
 13 DET A  9- 7-1997    19   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   1   0   0  13   1   0
 13 MIL N  6- 8-2004    28   1   5   1   0   0   1   6   4   0   1  13   3   0
 13 SD  N  5-25-2008    31   5   6   2   0   1   5  11   4   0   0  13   2   0
 13 CHI N  5- 7-2017    30   0   3   1   0   0   0   4   6   3   0  13   0   0

With the notable exception of the 2008 Padres game (which they won 12-9 in 18 innings), these are mostly long low-scoring games. And even the Padres game featured a four-inning nine-strikeout performance by Aaron Harang, who was making his only relief appearance of the year (although he didn't get the loss in that game, he would tie for the NL lead in losses that year with 17).

The other games include the 1968 Mets-Astros 24-inning 1-0 game (which, along with the 1-0 All-Star game that summer, seemed emblematic of the Year of the Pitcher), the 1971 A's-Angels game that finished in the early hours of the morning when Curt Blefary scored in the bottom of the 20th (and was followed by a bizarre news conference where Tony Conigliaro announced his retirement from baseball), and a 17-inning 1-0 game in 2004 between the Brewers and Angels. That 1971 contest set the major league record for the most strikeouts by one team in a game (26) and both the 2004 and 2017 games on this list tied it. It was tied again a few weeks later in 2017, that game lasting only twelve innings (and featuring 19 strikeouts in regulation).

Although it wasn't scoreless until the end, the 1964 Mets-Giants game did set a record for the longest contest by time in major league history, one that would last until 1984. Gaylord Perry pitched the last ten innings for the Giants to pick up the win, during which, at least according to a later autobiography, he threw his first spitball in a major league game.

Stolen Bases:

 SB  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  5 CAL A  6-10-1992    11   0   3   0   0   0   0   3   2   2   0   3   5   0
  5 SEA A  7-30-1998    33   3   9   1   0   1   3  13   6   3   0   5   5   0
  4 PIT N  6- 7-1972(2) 35   1   8   1   0   0   1   9   4   2   0  10   4   0
  4 PHI N  5-29-1978    17   1   3   0   0   0   1   3   4   1   0   4   4   0
  4 SD  N  8-15-1980    41   0  10   0   0   0   0  10   6   3   0  14   4   0
  4 LA  N  9-28-1986    24   2   3   0   0   0   2   3   2   1   0   2   4   0
  4 TEX A  6- 6-1987    14   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   4   2   0   6   4   0
  4 CHI N  5-22-1990    25   2   4   0   0   1   2   7   8   4   0  11   4   0
 72 teams with 3

We've seen the two games at the top of this list in the player's section, since they include Polonia's four extra-inning steals in 1992 and Amaral's three in 1998. (And the 1980 Padres game just appeared on the most strikeouts list.) In the 1972 Pirates game, Willie Stargell stole second base in the 18th on the back-end of a double steal. It was his only stolen base between 1969 and 1976. Al Oliver, who was on the front-end, would steal only one other base that year. I suspect that they were counting on the element of surprise.

Caught Stealing:

 CS  Team     Game      AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  TB  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS
  3 CHI A  6-12-1967    42   1   7   2   0   0   1   9   3   1   1   9   0   3
  3 WAS A  6-12-1967    38   2   8   0   0   0   2   8   6   2   0   4   0   3
  3 CLE A  9-13-1967    23   0   4   0   0   0   0   4   5   1   0   4   0   3
  3 PIT N  7- 6-1980    29   1   3   0   0   0   1   3   7   1   0  11   1   3
  3 PHI N  9-21-1981    25   0   5   1   0   0   0   6   4   0   1   3   1   3
  3 KC  A  6-12-1985    15   1   4   1   1   0   1   7   3   1   0   1   0   3
  3 SD  N  7-12-1990    18   0   4   1   0   0   0   5   3   0   0   5   0   3
  3 STL N  4- 4-2003     9   0   4   0   0   0   0   4   1   0   1   1   0   3
107 teams with 2

I'm pretty sure some teams from the Deadball Era will eclipse these marks once we have their play-by-play data, but for the time being, I think it's interesting that when the White Sox' Walt Williams was caught stealing second in the 17th inning of the game at the top of the list above, Chicago became the first team to be caught stealing three times in an extra-inning game since at least 1933, a "record" that would be tied an inning later when the Senators Ken McMullen was also thrown out at second.

And you have to admire the persistence of the 2003 Cardinals, who had a runner caught attempting to steal in all three of their extra-innings that day, the last failed attempt, by Fernando Vina, was part of a "strike em out, throw em out" double-play that ended the game.

Well, that pretty much does it for me this time. As always, thanks for your patience.

Extra-Inning Season and Career Batting Records

While writing my article on extra-inning single game batting records I noticed the appearance of Harry Simpson in two different games on the player lists and that got me wondering about season and career extra-inning performances. Was Harry Simpson, a decent enough hitter overall, some kind of monster once a game shifted into overtime? (Spoiler alert: he wasn't.)

So what is presented from here on out is done with the realization that what follows will probably exhaust the modest interest that most reasonable people will have in this very arcane subject.

Unlike the lists in the previous article, which were based on partial data from 1919 to 1933, the data in this article will only cover the years with complete data, 1934 to 2018.

So here are lists like the previous ones but for individual seasons:

At-bats:

 AB Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 34 Ray Mack              1943 CLE A  34   4   7   0   0   1   5   0   0   0   7   0   0  .206  .294
 33 Leo Cardenas          1969 MIN A  33   3   6   1   1   0   2   2   2   0   6   0   0  .182  .273
 32 Tony Lupien           1943 BOS A  32   3  10   2   0   0   3   1   1   0   0   2   1  .312  .375
 31 Bobby Doerr           1943 BOS A  31   2   6   1   0   0   3   2   1   0   4   3   0  .194  .226
 31 Oris Hockett          1943 CLE A  31   1   7   0   0   0   3   4   0   0   1   0   1  .226  .226
 31 Luis Aparicio         1968 CHI A  31   3  12   2   0   0   4   1   0   0   2   2   1  .387  .452
 31 Ted Uhlaender         1969 MIN A  31   4  10   0   0   0   2   4   1   0   2   0   1  .323  .323
 31 Martin Prado          2013 ARI N  31   2   4   1   0   0   4   2   0   0   1   0   0  .129  .161
 30 Irv Hall              1945 PHI A  30   4   8   0   0   0   3   1   0   0   4   1   0  .267  .267
 30 Max Alvis             1967 CLE A  30   3   7   1   0   1   2   1   0   0   5   0   1  .233  .367

Obviously, the players above were regulars on teams that appeared in a lot of extra-inning games. One thing to keep in mind is that, unlike at-bats in entire games, batting order position has little to do with making this list, since the first batter up in the tenth inning isn't predictable. For example, the two players from the 1943 Indians include Ray Mack, who primarily batted eighth that season, and Oris Hockett, who hit first. or second.

Four of the entries above come from 1943, the year that the "balata ball," a new baseball introduced that spring to conserve the war-time supply of rubber, caused a dramatic drop in scoring. I doubt it was a coincidence that 1943 had the highest percentage of extra-inning games in any year since at least 1905:

Year Total  ExG    Pct
1943  1238  171  13.81
1957  1235  162  13.12
1916  1247  157  12.59
1918  1016  125  12.30
1942  1224  146  11.93
1944  1242  141  11.35
1960  1236  140  11.33
1920  1234  138  11.18
1965  1623  180  11.09
1917  1247  135  10.83

The years with the lowest:

Year Total  ExG    Pct
1948  1237   88   7.11
1939  1231   91   7.39
1947  1243   93   7.48
2005  2431  182   7.49
2017  2430  182   7.49
2006  2429  185   7.62
2016  2428  185   7.62
1999  2428  191   7.87
2012  2430  192   7.90
1950  1238   98   7.92

Here are the teams with the most extra-inning at-bats (again, from 1934 to 2018):

 AB Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
284 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76   284  34  74  21   1   3  33  40  12   2  58   2   2  .261  .373
273 1969 MIN A  19  11   8  74.1 273  36  70  10   1   5  32  47  15   0  46   4   5  .256  .355
255 1943 CLE A  27  13  14  70   255  28  63   9   2   4  28  35   6   0  27   1   3  .247  .345
252 1945 PHI A  24  10  11  68   252  20  64   8   2   2  19  30   5   0  21   3   1  .254  .325
249 1973 LA  N  23  15   7  63.1 249  31  75  10   1   6  28  36  20   1  33   4   2  .301  .422
245 1943 BOS A  31  15  14  67.2 245  21  55   9   1   2  16  22   4   1  32   7   1  .224  .294
240 1967 CLE A  25  16   9  66   240  32  59  10   1   9  32  22   7   1  44   0   8  .246  .408
236 1980 CHI N  17   4  13  68.2 236  21  46   5   1   3  19  31  12   1  47   3   1  .195  .263
232 1944 CLE A  24  13  11  64   232  19  50   9   0   6  19  25   6   1  23   3   1  .216  .332
232 1977 MON N  19   8  11  62.2 232  17  56  10   1   1  17  25  11   0  36   4   1  .241  .306

The only player above whose team was not on this list was Luis Aparicio and his White Sox were tied for 34th place (with 215 at-bats).

The 31 extra-inning games by the 1943 Red Sox was easily the record, with the 1943 Browns and 1957 Tigers tied for second place with 28. By the way, the 1943 Red Sox and Browns faced each other in eight extra-inning games, including four in a row on May 31st and June 2nd.

But what about the teams with the fewest extra-inning at bats?

 AB Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 23 2017 CLE A   6   4   2   5.2  23   7   6   3   0   2   7   6   1   0   5   1   0  .261  .652
 28 1994 OAK A   6   3   3   7.2  28   5   8   1   0   0   5   6   2   0   5   1   0  .286  .321
 29 1936 STL A   3   1   2   8.1  29   1   5   0   0   0   1   1   0   1   5   0   0  .172  .172
 30 2016 ANA A   4   0   4   9    30   1   4   1   1   0   0   3   2   0  11   0   1  .133  .233
 31 1945 CHI N   6   4   2   7.1  31   8  11   3   0   0   7   6   3   0   6   0   0  .355  .452
 32 1939 NY  A   7   3   4   9.1  32   6   8   1   1   0   5  10   3   0   2   1   0  .250  .344
 32 1995 BAL A   5   2   3  10    32   2   5   0   0   1   2   4   1   2   8   1   1  .156  .250
 32 1998 ATL N   6   2   4   9.2  32   4   9   1   0   1   4   7   1   2   5   0   0  .281  .406
 32 2005 NY  A   8   4   4   8.2  32   7   8   1   1   2   7   8   1   0   8   0   0  .250  .531
  4 teams with 33

The three extra-inning games played by the 1936 Browns and the four by the 2016 Angels are the fewest since 1934. Only one of the Browns' games that year went past the 10th inning.

Runs:

  R Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  8 Pee Wee Reese         1942 BRO N  15   8   6   0   1   0   3   5   1   0   2   0   0  .400  .533
  8 Adam Jones            2012 BAL A  24   8   7   1   0   4  10   1   0   3   2   0   0  .292  .833
 17 players with 7

Pee Wee Reese accounted for more than a third (8 out of 23) of the extra-inning runs scored by the 1942 Dodgers. And Adam Jones will be showing up on three other lists below (home runs, RBIs and hit by pitches).

And the teams scoring the most runs:

  R Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 42 1991 TEX A  24  14  10  56.1 222  42  71  15   0   5  42  30   7   0  33   7   5  .320  .455
 39 1988 MON N  25  18   7  56   213  39  63   6   5   7  39  25  12   0  41   7   3  .296  .469
 36 1969 MIN A  19  11   8  74.1 273  36  70  10   1   5  32  47  15   0  46   4   5  .256  .355
 36 1973 CIN N  21  12   9  42.1 169  36  51   5   2   6  34  25   5   0  32   3   5  .302  .462
 34 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76   284  34  74  21   1   3  33  40  12   2  58   2   2  .261  .373
 33 2005 MIN A  23  15   8  45   181  33  55  13   1   5  31  29  13   2  36   3   1  .304  .470
 33 2012 BAL A  18  16   2  57   210  33  49   9   0   8  33  27   5   4  47   3   1  .233  .390
 32 1967 CLE A  25  16   9  66   240  32  59  10   1   9  32  22   7   1  44   0   8  .246  .408
 32 1998 SF  N  20  12   8  44.1 171  32  49  12   1   5  29  31   9   1  33   4   1  .287  .456
 32 2017 BOS A  18  15   3  54.2 219  32  60  10   0   3  30  32  10   5  46   5   0  .274  .361

I was a little surprised that the 1991 Rangers had one of the poorer records on the list above, but half of their runs were scored in four road wins, including eight runs in the top of the 11th on September 23rd. The 2012 Orioles went 16-2 while scoring nine fewer runs in the same amount of innings, helped along by allowing only 5 runs in overtime compared to 22 for Texas.

This article is not in general dealing with pitching or defense, but here are the most extra-innings runs allowed since 1934:

Runs Allowed:

 RA Year  Team   G   W   L INN    RS  RA
 39 2002 KC  A  19   7  12  37    18  39
 36 1969 OAK A  22  10  12  59    24  36
 34 1953 DET A  20   6  10  41    17  34
 34 1967 LA  N  27  10  17  57.2  17  34
 34 1970 STL N  21   5  16  49.2  12  34
 34 1978 NY  N  25   8  17  42.1  13  34
 33 1984 PIT N  26   9  17  52    27  33
 32 1957 DET A  28  13  15  63.1  18  32
 32 1975 MON N  26  12  14  60.1  20  32
 32 1979 STL N  24  10  14  56.1  29  32
 31 1980 SEA A  19   9   9  41    16  31
 31 1987 BOS A  15   3  12  28     6  31

And since runs scored and allowed are the basic components of wins and losses, here are the leaders in those areas as well:

Wins:

  W Year  Team   G   W   L INN    RS  RA
 19 1959 PIT N  21  19   2  35    31  10
 18 1949 CLE A  19  18   1  31.2  28   1
 18 1988 MON N  25  18   7  56    39  23
 17 1999 ATL N  22  17   5  41.2  27   6
 17 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76    34  18
 16 1957 STL N  26  16  10  49.2  24  16
 16 1967 CLE A  25  16   9  66    32  20
 16 1970 BAL A  25  16   9  47.1  31  16
 16 1991 PHI N  25  16   9  42.1  25  16
 16 1992 HOU N  21  16   5  41.1  25  10
 16 1992 STL N  26  16  10  59    25  20
 16 2012 BAL A  18  16   2  57    33   5

The Pirates great hitting in extra-innings helped them to a 19-2 overtime record in 1959, with Roy Face winning 11 of them without a loss. On two occasions, on August 30th and September 19th, he gave up the go-ahead run in the top of an extra-inning only to have his team score two in the bottom half to win.

The 1949 Indians allowed only a single run in 19 extra-inning games. It came on April 23rd, and cost them their only overtime loss of the season. Their streak of 17 straight extra-inning wins would end on the opening day of their 1950 season.

Only five of the teams above had winning records in regulation games.

Losses:

  L Year  Team   G   W   L INN    RS  RA
 18 1943 STL A  28  10  18  55.1  14  29
 17 1942 CIN N  26   9  17  62    16  26
 17 1967 LA  N  27  10  17  57.2  17  34
 17 1978 NY  N  25   8  17  42.1  13  34
 17 1984 PIT N  26   9  17  52    27  33
 16 1944 PHI N  22   6  16  49.2   7  20
 16 1965 HOU N  23   7  16  48.2  12  25
 16 1966 BOS A  22   6  16  44.1  14  23
 16 1970 STL N  21   5  16  49.2  12  34
 16 1974 NY  N  20   4  16  51.1   6  22
 16 1984 SF  N  22   6  16  50.2  11  24

I thought it was interesting that a total of 27 runs were scored in the 1944 Phillies' 22 extra-inning games. Absent ties (and they had none) that is only 5 over the minimum. I was wondering if that was unusual. It turns out that the 1972 Cubs went 6-9 in 15 extra-inning games and scored, you guessed it, 6 runs and allowed 9. Among teams playing 20 or more overtime games (ignoring ties), the closest to the minumum number of runs was the 1976 Royals, who went 13-7 while scoring 14 runs and allowing 8.

The highest ratio of runs to decisions was turned in by the 1994 Rockies, who were in only 5 extra-innings games, but had a combined 19 runs scored in the extra frames.

Hits:

  H Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 12 Luis Aparicio         1968 CHI A  31   3  12   2   0   0   4   1   0   0   2   2   1  .387  .452
 12 Vladimir Guerrero     2002 MON N  17   5  12   1   0   2   3   2   2   0   1   1   1  .706 1.118
 11 Harry Walker          1943 STL N  22   4  11   2   0   1   3   0   0   0   0   0   0  .500  .727
 11 Johnny Callison       1963 PHI N  15   5  11   1   1   2   4   4   2   0   1   0   0  .733 1.333
 11 Chuck Hinton          1967 CLE A  25   7  11   2   0   2   6   4   2   0   6   0   1  .440  .760
 11 Horace Clarke         1970 NY  A  21   3  11   1   1   0   4   2   2   0   0   2   0  .524  .667
 11 Larry Bowa            1971 PHI N  23   6  11   1   1   0   3   1   0   0   3   3   1  .478  .609
 11 Gary Carter           1985 NY  N  25   4  11   0   0   2   5   5   3   0   2   0   0  .440  .680
 11 Ryne Sandberg         1992 CHI N  25   6  11   1   0   0   1   3   0   0   6   1   0  .440  .480
 11 Chipper Jones         1999 ATL N  22   7  11   0   0   4   5   3   3   0   4   0   0  .500 1.045
 11 Andrew McCutchen      2018 SF/NYA 18   7  11   2   0   1   3   3   1   1   3   4   0  .611  .889

Vladimir Guerrero led his league in hits in the first nine innings as well in 2002, but the gap was considerably narrower (194 to Jeff Kent's 193). And while no other player on this list led their league in hits, both Clarke and Bowa topped their circuit in at-bats. Clarke also led in regulation at-bats, but Bowa would have trailed both Willie Davis and Lou Brock were it not for his advantage in overtime.

At the other end of the spectrum, here are the players with the most extra-inning at-bats in a season without a hit:

 AB Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 22 Ron Fairly            1967 LA  N  22   1   0   0   0   0   1   2   1   0   4   0   0  .000  .000
 21 Don Gutteridge        1945 STL A  21   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0  .000  .000
 18 Bill Melton           1974 CHI A  18   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   2   0   0  .000  .000
 16 Milt Byrnes           1943 STL A  16   1   0   0   0   0   0   5   0   0   1   0   0  .000  .000
 16 Sam Jethroe           1952 BOS N  16   1   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   3   1   0  .000  .000
 16 Jesus Figueroa        1980 CHI N  16   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   0   0  .000  .000
  7 players with 15

Ron Fairly's string of hitless at-bats reached 33 before his single in the 12th inning on August 10, 1968. He also had a string of 20 straight hitless extra-inning at-bats from 1969 to 1973. Wartime replacement Milt Byrnes' string was from the start of his career before it was finally broken after 18 hitless at-bats on May 16, 1944. Jethroe's streak had reached 17 by the end of his short career, while Figueroa retired still looking for his first extra-inning hit.

The teams with the most hits:

  H Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 75 1973 LA  N  23  15   7  63.1 249  31  75  10   1   6  28  36  20   1  33   4   2  .301  .422
 74 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76   284  34  74  21   1   3  33  40  12   2  58   2   2  .261  .373
 71 1991 TEX A  24  14  10  56.1 222  42  71  15   0   5  42  30   7   0  33   7   5  .320  .455
 70 1969 MIN A  19  11   8  74.1 273  36  70  10   1   5  32  47  15   0  46   4   5  .256  .355
 67 1996 SD  N  24  13  11  59.2 229  26  67  16   0   4  24  30  12   2  47   5   4  .293  .415
 64 1945 PHI A  24  10  11  68   252  20  64   8   2   2  19  30   5   0  21   3   1  .254  .325
 63 1943 CLE A  27  13  14  70   255  28  63   9   2   4  28  35   6   0  27   1   3  .247  .345
 63 1959 PIT N  21  19   2  35   156  31  63   8   1   4  31  20   8   2  12   1   0  .404  .545
 63 1988 MON N  25  18   7  56   213  39  63   6   5   7  39  25  12   0  41   7   3  .296  .469
 63 1992 STL N  26  16  10  59   226  25  63   7   1   4  24  23  10   1  50   7   5  .279  .372

These are a combination of teams that either hit very well or played in a lot of these games, with the two war-time teams, who combined to score a little more than 3 runs per nine extra-innings, examples of the latter.

Looking at the highest batting averages (minumum 25 hits)...

  AVG Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .431 1938 BOS A  10   9   1  13    58  14  25   6   1   1  13   7   2   0   4   1   0  .431  .621
 .425 2009 ANA A  11   7   4  16.2  73  20  31   2   0   2  20  13   3   1  14   4   0  .425  .534
 .415 1985 CHI A  15  11   4  22    94  21  39   6   0   3  20  12   5   2  10   4   2  .415  .574
 .407 1983 TOR A  17  11   6  28.1 118  27  48   6   4   4  26  18   7   1  14   0   3  .407  .627
 .404 1959 PIT N  21  19   2  35   156  31  63   8   1   4  31  20   8   2  12   1   0  .404  .545
 .403 1989 MIN A  12   8   4  15.2  72  11  29   5   0   1  11   4   4   0  16   0   1  .403  .514
 .400 1996 NY  A  10   4   6  17.1  75  17  30   5   0   3  17  14   4   1  17   1   1  .400  .587
 .397 1934 DET A  14  12   2  17.2  78  23  31  12   0   2  23  16   4   1   4   1   0  .397  .628
 .397 2004 SD  N  11   7   4  15.1  63  13  25   2   0   0  11   5   3   3   8   0   1  .397  .429
 .394 2011 LA  N  11   8   3  16.2  71  22  28   6   1   5  20  12   4   2  15   2   2  .394  .718

The 1938 Red Sox made short work of their ten extra-inning games, with seven of them lasting an inning or less. Jimmie Foxx reached base in all but one of his eight plate appearances, including two doubles and a homer, scoring the winning run in three of their wins.

The 2011 Dodgers converted their hits into the most runs per inning (edging out the 1934 Tigers). They scored in all but one of their extra-inning games, losing one of them despite taking a five-run lead in the top of the 10th.

And the highest slugging percentages (minumum 35 total bases):

  SLG Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .718 2011 LA  N  11   8   3  16.2  71  22  28   6   1   5  20  12   4   2  15   2   2  .394  .718
 .656 2013 LA  N  15  10   5  23    93  21  32   8   0   7  20  11   2   0  17   2   0  .344  .656
 .644 1959 BOS A  13   7   6  18    73  14  20   3   0   8  14  10   2   0   5   0   0  .274  .644
 .639 2003 PHI N  13  10   3  24    97  21  35   9   0   6  20  16   5   1  19   0   2  .361  .639
 .635 2006 NY  A  10   7   3  15.1  63  15  19   3   0   6  15   9   0   0  18   3   1  .302  .635
 .634 2000 OAK A  13   8   5  16.1  71  14  24   2   2   5  13  16   5   2  20   1   0  .338  .634
 .630 2001 CLE A  15   9   6  23.1  92  19  31   4   1   7  19  14   4   3  16   1   1  .337  .630
 .629 2015 WAS N  11   9   2  15    62  14  21   6   0   4  13  11   5   0  14   1   0  .339  .629
 .628 1934 DET A  14  12   2  17.2  78  23  31  12   0   2  23  16   4   1   4   1   0  .397  .628
 .627 1983 TOR A  17  11   6  28.1 118  27  48   6   4   4  26  18   7   1  14   0   3  .407  .627
 .627 2003 KC  A   9   5   4  13.1  59  11  24   4   0   3  11   2   0   2   6   0   0  .407  .627

Two Dodgers teams two years apart top this list. They were also above average in between:

  SLG Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .433 2012 LA  N  15   8   7  26.2 104  17  30   4   1   3  17  17   7   1  22   2   0  .288  .433

Here are the worst team averages, with a 60 at-bat minimum:

  AVG Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .111 2010 WAS N  13   3  10  24.2  81   3   9   2   0   1   3   9   0   3  22   1   0  .111  .173
 .113 1951 STL A  14   2  12  31.1 106   3  12   2   0   1   3  15   0   1  20   0   0  .113  .160
 .126 2015 TB  A  15   2  13  32   103   4  13   2   0   1   4  16   3   0  37   1   0  .126  .175
 .129 1995 DET A  12   4   8  26.2  93   8  12   3   0   1   6  12   4   3  26   1   1  .129  .194
 .130 1948 PHI N  10   2   8  22.2  77   3  10   1   2   1   3  13   6   0  14   4   0  .130  .234
 .133 1974 CLE A  12   2  10  27.1  90   3  12   1   0   0   3   5   1   0  11   2   0  .133  .144
 .140 1999 LA  N  16   4  12  35   114  12  16   2   0   3  10  22   4   0  31   0   2  .140  .237
 .142 1999 SF  N  14   7   7  35   120   9  17   2   0   4   8  17   6   2  28   2   0  .142  .258
 .143 1970 CHI A  10   2   8  26    84   4  12   1   0   1   2   4   1   0  13   0   2  .143  .190
 .145 1979 TOR A  12   2  10  18.1  62   4   9   1   0   2   4   6   1   0  12   1   1  .145  .258

  SLG Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .144 1974 CLE A  12   2  10  27.1  90   3  12   1   0   0   3   5   1   0  11   2   0  .133  .144
 .147 1952 PHI A  15   4  11  31.1 102   4  15   0   0   0   4  13   1   0  12   0   0  .147  .147
 .160 1951 STL A  14   2  12  31.1 106   3  12   2   0   1   3  15   0   1  20   0   0  .113  .160
 .172 1961 PIT N   8   1   7  19    64   2  11   0   0   0   1   7   1   0  10   0   0  .172  .172
 .173 1968 NY  N  15   2  13  58.2 196   5  31   3   0   0   3  12   2   0  51   4   2  .158  .173
 .173 2010 WAS N  13   3  10  24.2  81   3   9   2   0   1   3   9   0   3  22   1   0  .111  .173
 .175 2015 TB  A  15   2  13  32   103   4  13   2   0   1   4  16   3   0  37   1   0  .126  .175
 .181 2012 HOU N  12   1  11  22    72   1  12   1   0   0   1   9   1   0  18   2   2  .167  .181
 .189 1994 PHI N   8   2   6  21.2  74   3  13   1   0   0   3  15   5   0  13   1   0  .176  .189
 .190 1970 CHI A  10   2   8  26    84   4  12   1   0   1   2   4   1   0  13   0   2  .143  .190

These were all pretty bad teams for the most part, the three biggest exceptions being the 1952 Phillies (75-64 in regulation), the 1999 Giants, who managed to split their 14 extra-inning decisions despite their poor hitting on their way to a 86-76 mark, and the 2015 Rays, who had a 78-69 record apart from their extra-inning woes.

The 1961 Pirates, a year removed from a World Championship and two years from their outstanding 19-2 extra-inning mark, scored only two runs in overtime, one on a bases-loaded walk and the other on an error. That was twice as many runs as the 2012 Astros, however, whose only run in their 12 extra-inning games was a walk-off single by Scott Moore on their final overtime play of the year.

Doubles:

 2B Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  5 Charlie Gehringer     1934 DET A  11   7   8   5   0   1   3   2   0   0   0   0   0  .727 1.455
  5 Gene Moore            1941 BOS N  10   2   8   5   0   0   3   4   1   0   0   0   1  .800 1.300
  5 Jeff Kent             1998 SF  N  18   4   8   5   0   2   7   1   1   1   3   0   0  .444 1.056
 14 players with 4

Gehringer was a big reason for his Tigers' appearance on the highest team batting average and slugging percentage lists above. His doubles were part of 50 he would hit that year for the Tigers, a distant second in the league to teammate Hank Greenberg's 63.

In his other 387 at-bats in 1941, Gene Moore hit only 12 doubles.

The team list:

 2B Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 21 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76   284  34  74  21   1   3  33  40  12   2  58   2   2  .261  .373
 16 1996 SD  N  24  13  11  59.2 229  26  67  16   0   4  24  30  12   2  47   5   4  .293  .415
 15 1991 TEX A  24  14  10  56.1 222  42  71  15   0   5  42  30   7   0  33   7   5  .320  .455
 14 1949 CIN N  24  14   9  46.1 195  28  62  14   4   1  26  18   5   2  22   0   1  .318  .446
 13 1951 BOS A  16  12   4  53.2 204  30  50  13   4   8  29  35   4   1  22   0   1  .245  .466
 13 2005 MIN A  23  15   8  45   181  33  55  13   1   5  31  29  13   2  36   3   1  .304  .470
 13 2018 ARI N  14   5   9  38.2 146  12  37  13   0   2  11  21   7   0  38   6   2  .253  .384
 12 1934 DET A  14  12   2  17.2  78  23  31  12   0   2  23  16   4   1   4   1   0  .397  .628
 12 1940 BOS A  20  13   7  36   140  16  41  12   0   5  16  26   7   1  15   2   0  .293  .486
 12 1992 CLE A  18  10   8  52   187  18  46  12   0   4  18  22  10   1  26   4   3  .246  .374
 12 1998 SF  N  20  12   8  44.1 171  32  49  12   1   5  29  31   9   1  33   4   1  .287  .456

Thirteen different players on the 2013 Diamondbacks had one or more extra-inning doubles, led by Cody Ross, Gerardo Parra, and Adam Eaton with three each.

Triples:

 3B Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  3 Stan Musial           1943 STL N  17   3   7   0   3   0   2   5   3   0   0   0   0  .412  .765
  3 Harry Simpson         1952 CLE A  12   0   4   0   3   0   1   7   3   0   1   1   1  .333  .833
  3 Wally Moon            1954 STL N  19   6  10   0   3   1   2   2   1   0   0   1   1  .526 1.000
  3 Joe Morgan            1966 HOU N   9   4   6   0   3   0   5   2   0   0   1   0   0  .667 1.333
  3 Jose Reyes            2012 MIA N  12   4   8   1   3   1   4   5   4   0   0   0   0  .667 1.500
 55 players with 2

Every player on this list would, at one time or another, lead his league in triples, Musial a total of five times and Reyes four.

The team list:

Triples:

 3B Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  6 1952 CLE A  16   9   6  41.2 153  15  39   7   6   3  15  25   9   1  18   5   4  .255  .438
  5 1968 STL N  23  15   8  46   174  22  49  10   5   4  20  19   7   2  24   2   0  .282  .466
  5 1974 CHI N  20   9  11  51   186  16  43   3   5   2  15  28  12   0  29   3   2  .231  .333
  5 1988 MON N  25  18   7  56   213  39  63   6   5   7  39  25  12   0  41   7   3  .296  .469
 18 teams with 4

The 1952 Indians owe their spot at the top in large part to Harry Simpson, who was tied at the top of the player list. His three extra-inning triples included two in one game. Those two triples for Simpson were the first of his major league career and came after he'd played in 136 games. He would triple in each of his next two games as well.

Home Runs:

 HR Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  5 Charlie Maxwell       1960 DET A  17   5   6   0   0   5   7   2   1   0   3   0   0  .353 1.235
  5 Nelson Cruz           2010 TEX A   9   5   6   0   0   5   8   1   1   0   0   0   0  .667 2.333
  4 Willie Mays           1955 NY  N  15   7   7   0   0   4   6   4   1   0   1   0   0  .467 1.267
  4 Mark McGwire          1998 STL N  12   5   5   0   0   4   8   8   6   0   6   0   0  .417 1.417
  4 Ron Gant              1995 CIN N   7   4   5   0   0   4   6   3   2   0   0   1   0  .714 2.429
  4 Jim Thome             2001 CLE A   9   5   4   0   0   4   7   3   2   0   3   0   0  .444 1.778
  4 Chipper Jones         1999 ATL N  22   7  11   0   0   4   5   3   3   0   4   0   0  .500 1.045
  4 Adam Jones            2012 BAL A  24   8   7   1   0   4  10   1   0   3   2   0   0  .292  .833
  4 Khris Davis           2018 OAK A  15   4   5   0   0   4   7   2   1   1   5   0   0  .333 1.133
 60 players with 3

Charlie Maxwell had a reputation for doing most of his power-hitting on Sundays, one that began when he hit four homers in a row in a double-header on May 3, 1959. Despite this, none of his extra-inning homers came on that day, with one coming on Tuesday and two each on Friday and Saturday.

It occurred to me that many of these homers could have ended their game. My initial feeling was that close to half of them could, since an large majority of home runs in the bottom of an extra-inning would have decided the contest. But then I realized that while the visiting teams bat in each inning until they record three outs, the home team stops once they get the lead. As a result, visiting teams from 1934 to 2018 have scored 57.5% of all extra-inning runs (15,084 vs. 11,128), but have a much narrower edge in home runs (52.3% or 2,600 vs. 2,370).

Anyway, here are the season leaders in game-ending extra-inning homers from 1934 to 2018 (all with 3):

Player            Year  Team  Games
Andre Ethier      2009 LA  N  6- 6     6-29     9-15
Roy Sievers       1957 WAS A  6-30(2)  8- 3     9-14
Mickey Mantle     1959 NY  A  6-18     7-16(1)  9-13(1)
Joe Ferguson      1980 LA  N  6-19     8- 1     10- 3
Jim Thome         2001 CLE A  4-21     6-13     7- 7
Nelson Cruz       2010 TEX A  7-27     8-13     9-10

So Nelson Cruz and Jim Thome are on both lists.

But usually when people talk about game-ending hits, they also mean those that occur in the bottom of the 9th as well. So here are are the leaders if you include the 9th (all with 4):

Player            Year  Team  Games
Jimmie Foxx       1940 BOS A  6- 2(2)  6- 6     7- 3     8-16
Roy Sievers       1957 WAS A  4-23     6-30(2)  8- 3     9-14
Andre Ethier      2009 LA  N  6- 6     6-29     8- 6     9-15

If you include game-ending hits of any kind, Andre Ethier's 2009 season is still at the top of the list with six, adding a game-ending single on May 2nd and double on June 5th.

By the way, only one player has had more than one "walk-off" triple (and I realize that few people do much walking during these plays), and that was Jack Clark in 1980. He hit them on June 19th and July 26th. Both times he knocked in Joe Strain with the winning run.

The team HR list:

Home Runs:

 HR Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  9 1962 WAS A  16   8   7  34   127  15  28   3   1   9  15  10   1   1  21   0   3  .220  .472
  9 1966 PIT N  18   7  11  42.2 165  29  44   7   0   9  27  24   9   0  38   3   1  .267  .473
  9 1967 CLE A  25  16   9  66   240  32  59  10   1   9  32  22   7   1  44   0   8  .246  .408
  9 1992 HOU N  21  16   5  41.1 163  25  50   8   0   9  24  30  16   0  30   4   2  .307  .521
 24 teams with 8

Despite their extra-inning home runs, the 1962 Senators had the poorest offense in the league that year, scoring 53 fewer runs than the next worst team, and only the 1966 Pirates (second best in the NL) had above average hitters.

None of these teams had a player with more than three extra-inning homers, and the ones with three each are Bob Bailey and Willie Stargell with the Pirates, and Jeff Bagwell with the Astros.

Given the sometimes dramatic changes in home run rates, I was surprised that all four of the teams on this chart came from years and leagues with rates lower than those from this decade. The leagues represented above had HRs per 100 at-bats of 2.8, 2.5, 2.2 and 1.9, while the rates from 2015 to 2018 were 3.0, 3.4, 3.7 and 3.4. In addition, expansion has given more teams opportunities, with 30 teams since 1998, as opposed to 20 teams from 1962 to 1968.

RBIs:

RBI Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 11 Tim Wallach           1982 MON N  17   2   6   2   0   2  11   0   0   0   2   0   0  .353  .824
 11 Juan Gonzalez         1991 TEX A  27   4  10   2   0   2  11   2   0   0   2   1   2  .370  .667
 10 Clyde Vollmer         1951 BOS A  17   4   8   1   0   2  10   1   0   0   1   0   0  .471  .882
 10 Bob Bailey            1966 PIT N  16   5   5   1   0   3  10   2   0   0   3   0   0  .312  .938
 10 Jim Presley           1986 SEA A  13   5   5   2   0   2  10   1   0   0   3   0   0  .385 1.000
 10 Matt Kemp             2009 LA  N  19   2   6   1   0   1  10   2   0   0   6   2   0  .316  .526
 10 Adam Jones            2012 BAL A  24   8   7   1   0   4  10   1   0   3   2   0   0  .292  .833
  9 players with 9

In 1991 Juan Gonzalez played four overtime games between May 15th and 25th and knocked in two extra-inning runs in each of them. His efforts helped the Rangers to the top spot on the runs scored list shown above.

The obligatory (and not particularly interesting) team RBIs list:

RBI Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 42 1991 TEX A  24  14  10  56.1 222  42  71  15   0   5  42  30   7   0  33   7   5  .320  .455
 39 1988 MON N  25  18   7  56   213  39  63   6   5   7  39  25  12   0  41   7   3  .296  .469
 34 1973 CIN N  21  12   9  42.1 169  36  51   5   2   6  34  25   5   0  32   3   5  .302  .462
 33 2012 BAL A  18  16   2  57   210  33  49   9   0   8  33  27   5   4  47   3   1  .233  .390
 33 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76   284  34  74  21   1   3  33  40  12   2  58   2   2  .261  .373
 32 1967 CLE A  25  16   9  66   240  32  59  10   1   9  32  22   7   1  44   0   8  .246  .408
 32 1969 MIN A  19  11   8  74.1 273  36  70  10   1   5  32  47  15   0  46   4   5  .256  .355
 31 1959 PIT N  21  19   2  35   156  31  63   8   1   4  31  20   8   2  12   1   0  .404  .545
 31 2005 MIN A  23  15   8  45   181  33  55  13   1   5  31  29  13   2  36   3   1  .304  .470
 30 1939 CIN N  18  14   4  29   136  31  53  10   1   3  30  24  10   1  11   3   0  .390  .544
 30 1977 BAL A  23  15   8  34.1 138  30  41   6   1   5  30  19   8   1  20   5   2  .297  .464
 30 2017 BOS A  18  15   3  54.2 219  32  60  10   0   3  30  32  10   5  46   5   0  .274  .361

Actually, I thought that perhaps one (sort of) interesting thing is how few of these teams' runs were scored without an RBI being credited. Over the last 30 years, about 5% of all runs were RBI-less, while only 3% of the runs above were. Okay, so maybe that wasn't so interesting after all..

Walks:

 BB Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 11 Preston Wilson        2002 FLA N  10   2   1   0   0   0   1  11   3   1   4   2   0  .100  .100
 11 Paul Goldschmidt      2015 ARI N  10   5   6   2   0   1   3  11   5   0   1   0   0  .600 1.100
 10 Dick Allen            1972 CHI A   9   3   3   0   0   1   2  10   3   0   1   1   2  .333  .667
 10 Fred McGriff          1996 ATL N  16   0   2   1   0   0   0  10   5   0   6   0   0  .125  .188
 12 players with 9

McGriff didn't score after any of his ten walks in 1996, which was typical of the Braves that year. They're tied for seventh on the team walks chart below with 38 and only two of those came around to score. I was wondering if the odds against a walk or intentional walk scoring was markedly different in extra-innings. Here's what I found:

Regulation:
                Total Scored  Pct
  Walks        793240 197304 24.9
  Int. Walks    69161  11136 16.1

Extra-Innings:
                Total Scored  Pct
  Walks         18253   4073 22.3
  Int. Walks     8682    900 10.4

The Walks category does not include intentional walks.

So walks of both varieties score less often in extra-innings, in part because home innings may end before trailing runners get an opportunity to score. Another thing is that the intentional walk rate goes up dramatically as they constitute 8% of walks during regulation and 32% of walks after the 9th. Not that this is surprising given the sudden-death nature of extra-innings, but I was a little surprised that the rate quadrupled.

Intentional Walks:

IBB Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  7 Bobby Bonilla         1988 PIT N  11   5   4   0   0   1   3   9   7   1   0   0   0  .364  .636
  7 Barry Bonds           2004 SF  N   8   4   3   0   0   0   2   8   7   0   0   0   0  .375  .375
  7 Ryan Howard           2006 PHI N  10   1   3   0   0   1   2   7   7   0   6   0   0  .300  .600
 11 players with 6

One of the players in the group with six is Roger Maris in 1962, a year after he famously hit 61 home runs without a single intentional walk. Mickey Mantle, who batted behind Maris for most of the previous season, was not on deck for any of those six walks.

The same categories for teams:

 BB Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 47 1969 MIN A  19  11   8  74.1 273  36  70  10   1   5  32  47  15   0  46   4   5  .256  .355
 46 2002 FLA N  17   5  12  47.2 159  17  36   7   1   1  17  46  18   1  31   8   3  .226  .302
 41 1976 TEX A  26  13  13  56.1 204  18  45   6   1   1  16  41  13   0  28   4   1  .221  .275
 40 1974 KC  A  21  10  11  49   177  17  45  10   0   1  17  40  15   0  23   4   3  .254  .328
 40 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76   284  34  74  21   1   3  33  40  12   2  58   2   2  .261  .373
 39 1986 STL N  24  11  13  56.2 204  29  49  10   4   2  25  39  10   0  40   8   5  .240  .358
 38 1978 CHI N  20  12   8  43.1 161  25  41   9   1   2  23  38  11   2  31   4   3  .255  .360
 38 1996 ATL N  14   6   8  49.1 167   9  25   6   0   1   9  38  10   0  57   3   1  .150  .204
 37 1957 STL N  26  16  10  49.2 196  24  55   8   0   5  23  37  17   1  35   1   1  .281  .398
 37 1967 CHI A  20  12   8  64.1 225  23  51   7   0   4  21  37  12   1  46   2  10  .227  .311

Led by Preston Wilson, the 2002 Marlins walked nearly once an inning after the 9th. It was a strategy that worked well for their opponents, as they went only 5-12 in those games, compared to a 74-71 mark in regulation. I mentioned the 1996 Braves above, but their poor performance in extra-inning games (a .150/.307/.204 slash line and a losing record) is also in stark contrast to their performance in the rest of their games (90-58).

A slight digression: when I looked up the 1996 NL team batting totals to see how the Braves' overall offense ranked, I noticed that, ignoring the Coors-enhanced Rockies, the top five teams all scored between 771 and 778 runs, with the second group of five teams all grouped between 741 and 759 runs. So the difference between those ten teams was less than a quarter run per game.

IBB Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 20 1973 LA  N  23  15   7  63.1 249  31  75  10   1   6  28  36  20   1  33   4   2  .301  .422
 19 1982 SD  N  21  10  11  50.2 189  17  49   8   2   2  16  32  19   0  32   5   2  .259  .354
 18 2002 FLA N  17   5  12  47.2 159  17  36   7   1   1  17  46  18   1  31   8   3  .226  .302
 17 1957 STL N  26  16  10  49.2 196  24  55   8   0   5  23  37  17   1  35   1   1  .281  .398
 16 1949 CLE A  19  18   1  31.2 131  28  49   9   3   3  26  36  16   0  10   0   1  .374  .557
 16 1965 SF  N  16  11   5  36   140  23  38   6   1   3  19  23  16   0  25   1   2  .271  .393
 16 1968 CIN N  22  12  10  55   213  18  60  11   2   0  17  26  16   0  31   5   0  .282  .352
 16 1974 STL N  17  13   4  58   213  25  62   7   0   2  23  32  16   2  27   5   2  .291  .352
 16 1992 HOU N  21  16   5  41.1 163  25  50   8   0   9  24  30  16   0  30   4   2  .307  .521
  5 teams with 15

Cliff Floyd had six extra-inning intentional walks for the 2002 Marlins, all on or before June 14th. At that point, he was hitless in his six other overtime plate appearances.

Hit By Pitches:

HBP Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  3 Phil Roof             1967 KC  A   8   1   1   0   0   0   0   2   1   3   1   0   0  .125  .125
  3 Larry Parrish         1984 TEX A  13   2   8   2   0   1   2   3   2   3   1   0   0  .615 1.000
  3 Mark Loretta          1999 MIL N   7   1   1   1   0   0   2   1   0   3   3   0   0  .143  .286
  3 Adam Jones            2012 BAL A  24   8   7   1   0   4  10   1   0   3   2   0   0  .292  .833
  3 Danny Espinosa        2016 WAS N  13   4   3   0   0   0   0   1   0   3   4   2   0  .231  .231
 69 players with 2
Hit By Pitches:

HBP Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  7 1963 LA  A  18  11   7  48.1 172  17  41   7   1   1  14  27  12   7  32   2   3  .238  .308
  6 2011 WAS N  20  12   8  37.2 148  30  43  11   1   6  27  19   7   6  45   5   1  .291  .500
  6 2013 MIA N  20   7  13  49.2 168  13  33   3   0   2  11  18   5   6  34   5   0  .196  .250
  5 1952 NY  A  12   6   6  26    99  10  29   6   0   0   9  13   8   5  10   1   1  .293  .354
  5 1966 CHI A  23  14   9  44   164  20  40   4   2   1  16  24   8   5  36   4   3  .244  .311
  5 1991 CLE A  15   5  10  33.1 121  12  29   4   1   2  10  12   2   5  22   3   1  .240  .339
  5 1992 CHI N  23   8  15  53.1 194  17  52   4   0   2  17  23  10   5  35   3   0  .268  .320
  5 2007 HOU N  19   9  10  49.2 179  17  42   8   1   4  16  30   8   5  38   1   1  .235  .358
  5 2009 PHI N  16  11   5  31   116  22  28   3   0   5  21  20   3   5  25   4   0  .241  .397
  5 2012 TB  A  12   5   7  33   119  10  24   4   1   1  10  15   3   5  31   4   0  .202  .277
  5 2013 TEX A  12   3   9  27.1  92   8  15   3   0   3   7  11   2   5  23   3   1  .163  .293
  5 2017 BOS A  18  15   3  54.2 219  32  60  10   0   3  30  32  10   5  46   5   0  .274  .361

None of the players on the first list played for teams on the second. No one other than Phil Roof on the 1967 A's was hit by a pitch in extra-innings (and all of his came within a two-week period in the first half of June).

Danny Espinoso was hit in three consecutive extra-inning appearances on May 8th, June 15th, and July 1st. And while Espinoso's 2016 Nationals aren't on the team list, he was hit twice in overtime for the 2011 team, helping them to their second-place tie.

Strikeouts:

 SO Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 11 Ken Henderson         1974 CHI A  20   0   3   0   0   0   2   4   3   0  11   1   0  .150  .150
 10 Tommie Agee           1967 CHI A  19   3   4   1   0   1   2   2   1   0  10   0   0  .211  .421
 10 Darryl Strawberry     1985 NY  N  19   1   6   1   0   1   3   3   0   0  10   1   1  .316  .526
 10 Ken Caminiti          1996 SD  N  23   3   5   2   0   1   8   3   1   1  10   0   0  .217  .435
 10 Yan Gomes             2014 CLE A  19   1   4   0   1   0   0   2   2   0  10   0   0  .211  .316
 11 players with 9

Darryl Strawberry had half of those ten strikeouts in two games: an 18-inning victory over the Pirates as well as the famous 19-inning July 4th win over the Braves. And Ken Caminiti won the MVP award despite his appearance on this list.

 SO Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 64 2014 CHI N  18   8  10  50.2 183  14  44   7   2   4  14  25   5   1  64   5   2  .240  .366
 58 2013 ARI N  25  17   8  76   284  34  74  21   1   3  33  40  12   2  58   2   2  .261  .373
 57 1996 ATL N  14   6   8  49.1 167   9  25   6   0   1   9  38  10   0  57   3   1  .150  .204
 56 2014 CLE A  21  13   8  47.2 172  25  42  10   3   8  24  28   8   1  56   4   1  .244  .477
 54 2011 ATL N  26  14  12  52.2 195  24  53   7   0   4  23  31   6   1  54   2   0  .272  .369
 52 2013 CIN N  22  13   9  51.2 182  22  40   7   0   3  22  29   8   2  52   5   1  .220  .308
 51 1968 NY  N  15   2  13  58.2 196   5  31   3   0   0   3  12   2   0  51   4   2  .158  .173
 51 1997 ATL N  20  10  10  36.1 131  12  29   3   0   2  10  22   7   2  51   5   2  .221  .290
 51 2018 SF  N  21  11  10  46   181  18  46   6   3   3  17  16   5   3  51   7   0  .254  .370
  4 teams with 50

As expected, teams from the current decade dominate. Of the three teams before 2011, the 1968 Mets owe their appearance to 15 strikeouts in their 24-inning 1-0 loss to the Astros, while the 1996 and 1997 Braves were curiously awful in overtime, despite being a dominant team otherwise. We discussed the 1996 team earlier, but the from 1995 to 1998, the Braves went 21-31 in extra-inning games despite easily winning their division each season, reaching the World Series twice and winning once.

Stolen Bases:

 SB Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  7 Bert Campaneris       1969 OAK A  19   2   8   0   0   0   1   3   1   0   1   7   1  .421  .421
  6 Jacoby Ellsbury       2013 BOS A   8   3   3   0   0   0   0   2   1   0   1   6   0  .375  .375
  5 Willie Davis          1964 LA  N  19   1   4   1   0   0   0   1   0   1   1   5   1  .211  .263
  5 Matty Alou            1971 STL N  18   7  10   2   0   0   4   0   0   1   1   5   1  .556  .667
  5 Tim Raines            1985 MON N  20   5   7   1   0   0   0   3   1   0   2   5   0  .350  .400
  5 Eric Davis            1986 CIN N  13   2   2   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   5   5   1  .154  .154
  5 Eric Yelding          1990 HOU N  15   4   3   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   3   5   0  .200  .200
 26 players with 4

Except for Matty Alou, who stole 19 bases in 1971, these were all elite base stealers, the six of them stealing between 42 and 80 stolen bases, and averaging 62 in these seasons.

Jacoby Ellsbury had six steals in 2013 while apparently reaching base only five times (three singles and two walks). In addition to stealing second and third after a walk on June 10th, he also stole second while reaching base on catcher's interference on June 13th, and after reaching on a force-out on August 13th.

Eric Davis also made the most of his opportunities. He reached base three times (via two singles and a walk), where he stole second base twice and was caught stealing once. He also pinch-ran twice, including his two steals against the Mets in a wild tenth inning on July 22nd, a game that saw Davis ejected in that inning and ended with pitchers Jesse Orosco and Roger McDowell alternating between the mound and the outfield before Howard Johnson hit a three-run homer in the top of the 14th.

 SB Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 12 1985 CIN N  15  12   3  25.2 111  19  39   3   1   3  17  21  12   0  17  12   1  .351  .477
 12 1990 HOU N  27  14  13  36.1 143  23  40   7   2   3  21  24   9   2  29  12   2  .280  .420
 11 1969 OAK A  22  10  12  59   227  24  60   6   1   3  21  29  13   3  43  11   1  .264  .339
 11 1986 CIN N  18   8  10  42.2 161  18  44   3   2   3  18  21   4   0  31  11   3  .273  .373
 11 1991 CHI N  23  12  11  51   191  24  48   5   0   5  23  26   6   3  37  11   1  .251  .356
 11 1995 HOU N  21  11  10  49.2 185  21  53   9   2   6  19  27  11   3  43  11   2  .286  .454
 10 1976 CAL A  25  13  12  59   220  24  60   6   1   3  21  30  13   0  31  10   5  .273  .350
 10 1980 SD  N  13   6   6  45.2 158   9  32   4   1   1   8  26  13   0  35  10   2  .203  .259
 10 1990 MON N  21   9  12  50.2 186  17  46   3   0   2  13  23   7   1  28  10   4  .247  .296
 10 2013 BOS A  16  10   6  33.1 117  17  27   3   0   2  17  21   7   1  31  10   0  .231  .308

It took the 1985 Reds only 25 2/3 innings to steal their 12 bases. They started by stealing three bases in the 10th inning of their first extra-inning game on April 18th, and stole their last two when Gary Redus walked, stole second and third before scoring on a wild pitch on September 16th.

Caught Stealing:

 CS Player                Year  Team  AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  3 Luis Aparicio         1959 CHI A  18   2   5   0   0   0   1   1   0   0   1   3   3  .278  .278
  3 Joe Morgan            1972 CIN N  16   1   2   0   0   0   0   5   1   0   0   0   3  .125  .125
  3 Chico Salmon          1965 CLE A   9   2   4   0   0   0   3   0   0   0   2   1   3  .444  .444
  3 John Stearns          1979 NY  N  21   0   7   1   0   0   3   3   1   1   1   0   3  .333  .381
  3 Joe Simpson           1982 SEA A  18   1   6   2   0   0   0   3   1   0   4   0   3  .333  .444
  3 Carney Lansford       1981 BOS A  12   1   4   0   0   0   4   3   0   1   2   1   3  .333  .333
  3 Josh Barfield         2007 CLE A   5   3   4   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   3  .800  .800
115 players with 2

Luis Aparicio in 1959 (81.2%) and Joe Morgan in 1972 (77.3%) had high stolen base success rates the years they were caught three times in extra-innings, stealing 56 and 58 bases respectively. None of the others on the list stole more than 15 bases in their seasons, ranging from Josh Barfield, who was successful on 14 of 16 attempts in 2007 during regulation, to Joe Simpson, whose success rate was a woeful 36.4%.

Caught Stealing:

 CS Year  Team   G   W   L INN    AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 10 1967 CHI A  20  12   8  64.1 225  23  51   7   0   4  21  37  12   1  46   2  10  .227  .311
  8 1967 CLE A  25  16   9  66   240  32  59  10   1   9  32  22   7   1  44   0   8  .246  .408
  8 1982 SEA A  21   9  12  61.1 219  17  49   8   0   4  16  24   5   0  36   6   8  .224  .315
  6 1959 CHI A  16  12   3  50   173  16  37   4   0   4  15  29  11   1  25   4   6  .214  .306
  6 1968 CLE A  16  12   4  43   151  17  34   5   0   4  16  24  12   3  27   8   6  .225  .338
  6 1978 CIN N  15  11   4  31.1 118  16  34   4   0   4  16  25   7   1  22   6   6  .288  .424
 21 teams with 5

While the 1967 White Sox and Indians were spectacularly unsuccessful in their extra-inning stealing attempts, that didn't stop them from winning the majority of their games. The 1967 and 1968 Indians, who were caught stealing 14 times over the two years, spread them among ten different players, and none of them were nabbed more than twice.

Well that brings us, after an over-long journey, to our career leaders. L ike the first part of this article, we'll be using data from 1934 to 2018.

The leaders in at-bats:

  AB Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank    Pct
 292 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603   12   2.68
 283 Pete Rose            283  43  83  19   2   2  27  66  30   4  32   7   1  .293  .396    1   2.01
 279 Brooks Robinson      279  23  73  13   1   7  32  30  15   0  33   1   1  .262  .391   15   2.62
 264 Andre Dawson         264  27  71  10   2   8  35  33  23   4  46   9   3  .269  .413   26   2.66
 258 Carl Yastrzemski     258  30  57  12   2   8  20  65  22   0  48   6   2  .221  .376    3   2.15
 254 Hank Aaron           254  38  76  13   4  14  38  63  29   0  29   7   3  .299  .547    2   2.05
 253 Lou Brock            253  33  77   8   2   5  27  35  14   1  48  15  12  .304  .411   20   2.45
 250 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532   24   2.50
 242 Willie Davis         242  30  52   8   2   4  15  21  14   4  23  11   2  .215  .314   51   2.64
 237 Dave Winfield        237  36  51  10   0   9  20  42  23   0  37   7   4  .215  .371    9   2.15

The two columns after the slugging percentage:

Rank - the overall rank in at-bats from 1934 to 2018.
Pct  - the percentage of the player's total at-bats for those years that took place in extra-innings.

Highest ranked player not on list: Cal Ripken (11,551 at-bats). His extra-inning stats:

Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank    Pct
Cal Ripken           192  25  49  11   1   4  21  27  13   2  34   0   1  .255  .385    4   1.66

Not surprisingly, these are all players with long careers and their percentages of extra-inning at-bats range from 2.01 to 2.68. I was wondering what the range would look like if we looked at all players with 40 or more at-bats. Here's are the two ends of the spectrum:

   Pct Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
 10.85 Lindy McDaniel        41   5   5   0   0   1   3   1   0   0  19   0   0  .122  .195  10.85
  9.49 Hoyt Wilhelm          41   2   4   0   0   0   2   1   0   0  18   0   0  .098  .098   9.49
  5.43 Harry Spilman         44   3  13   5   0   1   7   3   2   0  10   0   0  .295  .477   5.43
  5.06 Byron Browne          44   1   5   1   0   0   2   7   2   0  12   0   0  .114  .136   5.06
  4.96 Chico Ruiz            57   5  18   2   0   0   1   4   1   0  10   2   1  .316  .351   4.96
  . . .
  1.28 Carlos Lee           102  15  33   7   0   5  21  19  10   0  15   3   0  .324  .539   1.28
  1.25 Jason Giambi          91  20  29   0   0   9  18  28   6   2  19   0   0  .319  .615   1.25
  1.25 Nolan Arenado         42   7  11   1   0   2   3   8   1   1   8   0   0  .262  .429   1.25
  1.24 Elvis Andrus          70  10  21   1   0   0   4   4   0   1   6   3   1  .300  .314   1.24
  1.10 Hideki Matsui         49   3   9   1   1   1   4  16   6   0  13   1   0  .184  .306   1.10

At the top of the list we have two relief pitchers and players who pinch-hit frequently. I'm not sure what to make of the bottom of the list.

Raising the minimum to 100 at-bats eliminates the relievers and adds a Hall of Famer:

   Pct Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  3.78 Vic Davalillo        152  20  49   9   2   1  14  10   7   0  10   8   1  .322  .428   3.78
  3.73 Manny Mota           141  20  42   5   3   1  19  27  15   0  14   2   1  .298  .397   3.73
  3.72 Russ Snyder          135  17  22   4   2   1   9   9   2   1  21   2   1  .163  .244   3.72
  3.67 Tommy McCraw         145  14  39   5   3   1  14  22  10   1  22   6   3  .269  .366   3.67
  3.52 Elliott Maddox       100   4  23   4   0   1   6  13   2   0  16   3   2  .230  .300   3.52
  . . .
  1.42 Paul Konerko         119  11  24   1   0   6  15  31  16   2  25   1   0  .202  .361   1.42
  1.41 Kirby Puckett        102  19  37   8   0   1   9  12   7   1  15   2   1  .363  .471   1.41
  1.40 Orlando Cabrera      106  15  34   5   1   5  17   8   3   0  15   3   0  .321  .528   1.40
  1.34 Todd Helton          107  19  33   6   0   4  12  32  11   0  21   0   0  .308  .477   1.34
  1.28 Carlos Lee           102  15  33   7   0   5  21  19  10   0  15   3   0  .324  .539   1.28

Here are the career leaders in runs scored and hits:

   R Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  57 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603    5
  48 Barry Bonds          195  48  51   9   3  11  28  90  42   1  38  15   2  .262  .508    2
  45 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532   10
  44 Rickey Henderson     205  44  56  10   3   4  22  50  11   2  28  27   1  .273  .410    1
  44 Tim Raines           223  44  76  11   1   3  23  50  24   1  16  29   0  .341  .439   31
  43 Pete Rose            283  43  83  19   2   2  27  66  30   4  32   7   1  .293  .396    4
  43 Rod Carew            219  43  73  15   1   2  22  41  17   1  22  10   6  .333  .438   47
  41 Jack Clark           179  41  58   5   2  18  41  52  20   1  41   3   4  .324  .676  157
  40 Joe Morgan           227  40  65  12   3   3  31  55  12   1  19  11   9  .286  .405   20
  39 Mickey Mantle        122  39  44   8   1  14  28  40   8   0  19   4   2  .361  .787   15
  39 Don Baylor           201  39  66  12   0  10  33  21   6   6  21   8   3  .328  .537   95

Highest ranked player not on list: Hank Aaron (2,174 runs, good for 3rd place).

   H Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  87 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603    7
  83 Pete Rose            283  43  83  19   2   2  27  66  30   4  32   7   1  .293  .396    1
  81 Tony Perez           230  36  81  14   1  10  34  31  19   0  45   3   0  .352  .552   37
  81 Tony Gwynn           206  33  81  13   0   3  20  43  29   0  13  15   5  .393  .500   13
  77 Lou Brock            253  33  77   8   2   5  27  35  14   1  48  15  12  .304  .411   21
  76 Hank Aaron           254  38  76  13   4  14  38  63  29   0  29   7   3  .299  .547    2
  76 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532   26
  76 Tim Raines           223  44  76  11   1   3  23  50  24   1  16  29   0  .341  .439   50
  73 Brooks Robinson      279  23  73  13   1   7  32  30  15   0  33   1   1  .262  .391   30
  73 Rod Carew            219  43  73  15   1   2  22  41  17   1  22  10   6  .333  .438   20

Highest ranked player not on list: Stan Musial (3,630 hits). His extra-inning stats:

Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
Stan Musial          188  30  66   9   6  11  31  48  23   2   8   2   2  .351  .638    3

Many of these players are on both lists, although Mickey Mantle had by far the fewest at-bats of anyone else here. So let's look at batting average and slugging percentage. First, batting average (minimum 35 hits):

  AVG Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .400 Hanley Ramirez       115  22  46  10   0   5  21  14   8   2  20   3   0  .400  .617
 .394 Nick Markakis        137  32  54  10   0   3  12  27  12   1  19   2   1  .394  .533
 .394 Dante Bichette       104  16  41   7   0   7  30  10   5   2  15   2   2  .394  .663
 .393 Tony Gwynn           206  33  81  13   0   3  20  43  29   0  13  15   5  .393  .500
 .384 Jerry Lumpe           99  18  38   7   2   3  12  13   4   0   5   0   0  .384  .586
 .381 Ken Griffey Sr.      168  23  64   9   2   1  17  16   5   0  21   8   5  .381  .476
 .378 Jesse Barfield        98  13  37   7   0   5  15  15   4   1  20   4   1  .378  .602
 .377 Horace Clarke        106  17  40   2   2   2  15  14   2   1   5   8   2  .377  .491
 .375 Vladimir Guerrero    120  15  45   6   0   6  17  21  15   1  14   2   1  .375  .575
 .372 Dick Groat           145  19  54  10   1   0  19   7   1   1  10   0   0  .372  .455

Dante Bichette's totals above are split pretty evenly between his years with the Rockies and those with other teams. When not based in Colorado, his batting average was .333 (17-51), while his Colorado average was .453 (24-53).

And in case you're wondering, Ken Griffey Jr. did not fare as well as his father in extra-innings:

  AVG Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .257 Ken Griffey Jr.      183  25  47   6   0   9  21  40  24   3  34   5   4  .257  .437

And slugging percentage (minimum 50 total bases):

  SLG Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .787 Mickey Mantle        122  39  44   8   1  14  28  40   8   0  19   4   2  .361  .787
 .762 Justin Upton          84  26  30   8   1   8  19  23   3   0  24   2   0  .357  .762
 .745 Jeff Heath            98  21  36   9   2   8  24  15   7   0  10   0   3  .367  .745
 .736 Ted Williams         129  29  47   9   0  13  32  37  11   2   7   0   0  .364  .736
 .727 Jimmie Foxx           88  20  34   6   0   8  15  15   5   0  11   1   0  .386  .727
 .704 Carlos Pena           81  18  27   3   0   9  21  18   8   1  24   1   1  .333  .704
 .676 Jack Clark           179  41  58   5   2  18  41  52  20   1  41   3   4  .324  .676
 .665 Albert Pujols        155  27  47   9   1  15  37  34  18   0  14   3   2  .303  .665
 .663 Dante Bichette       104  16  41   7   0   7  30  10   5   2  15   2   2  .394  .663
 .639 Adam Dunn            108  20  35   7   0   9  25  26   7   4  31   2   0  .324  .639

From 1959 to 1963, Mickey Mantle homered eight times in 39 extra-innning at-bats.

The chart above doesn't include the first nine seasons of Jimmie Foxx's career, including 1932 and 1933, when he hit a combined 106 home runs.

Albert Pujols had a .765 extra-inning slugging percentage with the Cardinals, and up through 2018, a .491 percentage with the Angels. If he drops off the list eventually, another Cardinal is waiting to take his place: Stan Musial and his .638 slugging percentage.

Now for the flip side of the coin, the worst batting averages and slugging percentages (minimum 100 at-bats):

  AVG Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .160 Mike Cameron         131  16  21   0   2   3  12  22   3   0  41   9   0  .160  .260
 .163 Russ Snyder          135  17  22   4   2   1   9   9   2   1  21   2   1  .163  .244
 .164 Chet Lemon           134  16  22   5   1   1   7  18   3   1  22   4   1  .164  .239
 .167 Steve Yeager         114  10  19   3   0   3  13  11   3   0  26   0   0  .167  .272
 .176 Mookie Wilson        125  16  22   2   2   2   8  16   6   0  27  11   0  .176  .272
 .178 Rajai Davis          107  19  19   5   1   0   8   9   1   1  30  12   1  .178  .243
 .179 Joe Pepitone         117  10  21   4   1   3  13   8   7   1  10   1   1  .179  .308
 .181 Jose Bautista        127  11  23   5   0   4  16  37   7   0  32   1   0  .181  .315
 .182 Jeff Francoeur       110  14  20   4   0   2  13  13   5   2  20   4   0  .182  .273
 .183 Bud Harrelson        126  12  23   4   2   0   5  18   3   0  17   5   0  .183  .246

Earlier, we saw that Russ Snyder had the third highest percentage of at-bats in extra-innings (among those with 100 or more at-bats). A large reason behind his appearance on that list was his role as a late-inning pinch-hitter, while he makes this list because of his awful performance in that role. While he hit for a decent average for his era (.279) when playing in the outfield, he managed to get only 50 hits in 281 pinch-hit at-bats over the course of his career.

  SLG Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
 .205 Jeff Burroughs       112  11  22   1   0   0   6  26  13   1  35   0   0  .196  .205
 .214 Ron Hunt             112   9  22   2   0   0   6  22   7   5   7   2   1  .196  .214
 .227 Dave Martinez        110  10  22   3   0   0   5  18   2   1  22   5   1  .200  .227
 .235 Terry Puhl           115  10  25   2   0   0   4  22   7   0  20   4   0  .217  .235
 .239 Mark Belanger        134  19  30   2   0   0  14  22   3   1  15   7   2  .224  .239
 .239 Chet Lemon           134  16  22   5   1   1   7  18   3   1  22   4   1  .164  .239
 .240 Deron Johnson        129   8  25   3   0   1  11  19   7   0  31   0   0  .194  .240
 .243 Rajai Davis          107  19  19   5   1   0   8   9   1   1  30  12   1  .178  .243
 .244 Russ Snyder          135  17  22   4   2   1   9   9   2   1  21   2   1  .163  .244
 .246 Bud Harrelson        126  12  23   4   2   0   5  18   3   0  17   5   0  .183  .246

Jeff Burroughs won an MVP award with the 1974 Rangers and later hit 41 homers for the Braves, but he was helpless after the ninth inning, with only one career extra-base hit and a sub .200 batting average. He did manage to collect nearly twice as many intentional walks as anyone else on this list, but that was about the only nice thing you could say about his batting line.

And Terry Puhl is most famous for his success against Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver, but unfortunately never faced him in extra-innings.

  2B Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  19 Pete Rose            283  43  83  19   2   2  27  66  30   4  32   7   1  .293  .396    1
  16 Dave Parker          236  24  67  16   1   3  12  37  26   0  48   1   5  .284  .398   33
  16 George Brett         190  34  64  16   1   7  27  51  30   0  16   4   1  .337  .542    4
  15 Rod Carew            219  43  73  15   1   2  22  41  17   1  22  10   6  .333  .438   81
  15 Craig Biggio         228  36  64  15   1   3  13  37  14   7  48  12   1  .281  .395    3
  14 Tony Perez           230  36  81  14   1  10  34  31  19   0  45   3   0  .352  .552   44
  14 Ted Simmons          216  27  65  14   1   8  32  39  21   1  13   0   0  .301  .486   61
  11 players with 13

  2B Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  19 Pete Rose            283  43  83  19   2   2  27  66  30   4  32   7   1  .293  .396   6.71
  16 George Brett         190  34  64  16   1   7  27  51  30   0  16   4   1  .337  .542   8.42
  13 Johnny Ray           132  17  38  13   1   2  15   6   4   0   7   0   2  .288  .447   9.85
  12 Charlie Gehringer     67  16  28  12   0   3   9  17   7   0   2   0   0  .418  .731  17.91
   6 Nelson Santovenia     29   6  12   6   0   1   8   1   0   0   4   0   0  .414  .724  20.69
   5 Bob Zupcic            20   4   8   5   0   0   4   5   1   0   0   0   0  .400  .650  25.00
   3 Larry Raines           4   3   4   3   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0 1.000 1.750  75.00
  28 players with 1 double in 1 at-bat

Highest ranked player not on list: Stan Musial (725 doubles, good for 2nd place).

For this and the next several categories, I'll present both the top totals as well as the highest percentage of the event per at-bat at each level. So, in the second chart, Pete Rose has the highest rate of doubles per at-bat for every player with 17 or more doubles (he's the only one in that category), George Brett has the highest rate for those with 14-16 doubles, and so on.

Like Foxx above, the line for Gehringer is missing the beginning of his career, including several great seasons. We discussed his performance in 1934 above, but during the first five years we have (1934 to 1938), he was incredible in extra-innings (23-41 with ten doubles and three homers).

Larry Raines had a short career with the Indians in the late 1950s, but he was perfect in his four extra-inning games (all in 1957), doubling in his first three and singling in his last.

  3B Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
   8 Joe DiMaggio         106  16  31   3   8   4  19  13  10   1   3   1   0  .292  .585   10
   6 Stan Musial          188  30  66   9   6  11  31  48  23   2   8   2   2  .351  .638    1
   6 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603    6
   6 Wally Moon           124  26  41   3   6   3  15  26   8   0  11   1   2  .331  .524  193
   5 Del Ennis            147  18  44   7   5   6  25  19  10   1  21   1   0  .299  .537  125
  16 players with 4

  3B Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
   8 Joe DiMaggio         106  16  31   3   8   4  19  13  10   1   3   1   0  .292  .585   7.55
   2 Albert Hall           16   3   7   1   2   0   2   3   0   0   3   1   2  .438  .750  12.50
   1 Jamal Strong           1   1   1   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0 1.000 3.000 100.00

Highest ranked player not on list: Roberto Clemente (166 triples). His extra-inning stats:

Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
Roberto Clemente     212  26  57   5   3   3  22  28  19   1  36   4   1  .269  .363    2

Only Del Ennis on the first chart didn't lead his league at least once in triples, and he had ten or more on two occasions. Jamal Strong had only a few callups with the Mariners in the mid-2000s, but is the only player in our database to triple in his only extra-inning at-bat. It came leading off a six-run tenth inning for Seattle and was his first major league hit and only career extra-base hit.

Fun fact: if Joe DiMaggio had tripled during the first nine innings at the same rate he did after, he would have hit 515 triples in his career.

  HR Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  22 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603    4
  18 Jack Clark           179  41  58   5   2  18  41  52  20   1  41   3   4  .324  .676   95
  16 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532    9
  15 Albert Pujols        155  27  47   9   1  15  37  34  18   0  14   3   2  .303  .665    5
  14 Mickey Mantle        122  39  44   8   1  14  28  40   8   0  19   4   2  .361  .787   17
  14 Hank Aaron           254  38  76  13   4  14  38  63  29   0  29   7   3  .299  .547    2
  13 Ted Williams         129  29  47   9   0  13  32  37  11   2   7   0   0  .364  .736   18
  12 Willie Stargell      188  23  53   7   2  12  32  38  18   3  65   1   2  .282  .532   28
  12 Mark McGwire         110  21  30   2   1  12  30  37  21   2  30   0   0  .273  .636   10
  12 Rafael Palmeiro      178  36  58  10   0  12  37  44  24   0  18   1   0  .326  .584   12
  12 Jim Thome            153  29  37   8   0  12  26  41  14   0  56   1   0  .242  .529    7
  12 David Ortiz          139  17  36   9   0  12  26  26  17   0  23   0   0  .259  .583   16

  HR Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  22 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603   7.53
  18 Jack Clark           179  41  58   5   2  18  41  52  20   1  41   3   4  .324  .676  10.06
  14 Mickey Mantle        122  39  44   8   1  14  28  40   8   0  19   4   2  .361  .787  11.48
   6 Eric Hinske           50  10  13   1   0   6  11  19   4   0  15   4   1  .260  .640  12.00
   5 Chris Jones           33  11  11   3   0   5  11   4   0   0  11   2   0  .333  .879  15.15
   4 Chris Herrmann        21   7   7   0   0   4  10   4   0   0   3   0   0  .333  .905  19.05
   3 Bud Zipfel            10   3   6   1   0   3   4   1   0   0   2   0   0  .600 1.600  30.00
   2 Earl Wilson            3   2   2   0   0   2   4   0   0   0   0   0   0  .667 2.667  66.67
   6 players with 1 home run in 1 at-bat

The top chart is the first occasion were the overall leader in the category (Barry Bonds) is missing. He would've shown up in the next group of seven players tied for 13th place with 11 homers. Still, it's odd to see him in a tie with players like Lance Parrish and Graig Nettles. We'll see later that part of the problem was how often pitchers refused to let him swing the bat in extra-innings. But he also had a much lower home run rate in these situations when he did get the opportunity to him (5.64 / 7.73) and a slugging percentage nearly 100 points lower (.508 / .607).

Bud Zipfel played for the expansion Senators in their first two seasons and managed to hit three of his ten career home runs in extra innings. The last (and the last of his major league career) came after he had already singled in the 11th and 13th and provided the margin of victory in a 16-inning 2-1 win that today is remembered because Tom Cheney, the starting pitcher for Washington that day, went the distance, striking out 21 men.

Earl Wilson batted twice in extra-innings in 1966. In the first, his tenth inning home run off of Jim Palmer helped him to a complete-game 3-2 victory over the Orioles. The next, also against the Orioles but this time in a Tigers' uniform, resulted in a game-winning three-run pinch-hit homer in the 13th inning off of Stu Miller.

 RBI Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  45 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603    7
  44 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532   14
  41 Jack Clark           179  41  58   5   2  18  41  52  20   1  41   3   4  .324  .676  129
  38 Hank Aaron           254  38  76  13   4  14  38  63  29   0  29   7   3  .299  .547    1
  38 Johnny Bench         182  28  50   8   1   8  38  32  11   1  26   5   1  .275  .462   63
  37 Tommy Davis          177  19  64   9   2   7  37  18  12   0  16   3   1  .362  .554  192
  37 Rafael Palmeiro      178  36  58  10   0  12  37  44  24   0  18   1   0  .326  .584   11
  37 Albert Pujols        155  27  47   9   1  15  37  34  18   0  14   3   2  .303  .665    4
  35 Andre Dawson         264  27  71  10   2   8  35  33  23   4  46   9   3  .269  .413   30
  35 Lance Parrish        168  23  49   9   1  11  35  21  12   2  40   1   0  .292  .554  183
  35 Matt Kemp            125  21  39   7   1   8  35  13   5   0  33   4   4  .312  .576  217

 RBI Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  45 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603  15.41
  44 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532  17.60
  41 Jack Clark           179  41  58   5   2  18  41  52  20   1  41   3   4  .324  .676  22.91
  37 Albert Pujols        155  27  47   9   1  15  37  34  18   0  14   3   2  .303  .665  23.87
  35 Matt Kemp            125  21  39   7   1   8  35  13   5   0  33   4   4  .312  .576  28.00
  30 Dante Bichette       104  16  41   7   0   7  30  10   5   2  15   2   2  .394  .663  28.85
  23 Dick Stuart           78  10  21   5   1   5  23  12   3   0  18   0   0  .269  .551  29.49
  17 Joe Crede             55   8  14   2   0   4  17   3   0   0   7   0   0  .255  .509  30.91
  13 Hector Sanchez        27   3  12   0   0   2  13   2   1   0   7   0   0  .444  .667  48.15
  10 Robinson Chirinos     16   2   8   1   0   1  10   5   0   0   6   0   0  .500  .750  62.50
   9 Frank Secory           5   2   3   1   0   2   9   0   0   0   1   0   0  .600 2.000 180.00
   5 players with 2 RBIs in 1 at-bat

Highest ranked player not on list: Alex Rodriguez (2,086 RBIs). His extra-inning stats:

Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
Alex Rodriguez       156  25  44   9   1   9  33  31  13   2  42  10   4  .282  .526    2

In addition to noticing the highest ranked player missing from these lists, I was also interested in seeing the outliers who made the cut. And one of the most notable has been Jack Clark, who is appearing on his third list (not counting slugging percentage), despite an overall ranking of 157th (runs), 95th (homers), and 129 (RBIs).

Frank Secory is most well-known for his 19-year umpiring career, where he set an NL record (since broken) by umpiring in nine no-hitters, the last being Dock Ellis' famous LSD no-hiiter against the Pirates in 1970. But before that he was a left-fielder in small parts of five seasons from 1940 to 1946. He batted five times in extra-innings, the last three resulting in a bases-clearing double, a walk-off grand-slam, and a game-ending two-run homer. He would get one more single (in regulation the next day), before ending his playing career by going hitless in his last 14 at-bats, spread over 13 games. By 1948, he would be umpiring in the West Texas-New Mexico league, four years away from reaching the National League.

  BB Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  90 Barry Bonds          195  48  51   9   3  11  28  90  42   1  38  15   2  .262  .508    1
  66 Pete Rose            283  43  83  19   2   2  27  66  30   4  32   7   1  .293  .396   12
  65 Carl Yastrzemski     258  30  57  12   2   8  20  65  22   0  48   6   2  .221  .376    5
  63 Hank Aaron           254  38  76  13   4  14  38  63  29   0  29   7   3  .299  .547   22
  60 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532   20
  58 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603   18
  57 Mark Grace           191  32  58  11   1   6  23  57  23   1  14   3   3  .304  .466   74
  56 Mike Schmidt         175  25  40   6   2   9  27  56  26   1  46   4   0  .229  .440   15
  55 Joe Morgan           227  40  65  12   3   3  31  55  12   1  19  11   9  .286  .405    4
  54 Frank Thomas         123  22  41   3   0   7  21  54  15   3  26   0   3  .333  .528    8

  BB Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  90 Barry Bonds          195  48  51   9   3  11  28  90  42   1  38  15   2  .262  .508  31.47
  18 Kal Daniels           38  10  14   1   0   4   8  18   1   1   8   1   0  .368  .711  31.58
  13 Ken Phelps            23   2   4   0   1   1   2  13   4   0  10   1   0  .174  .391  36.11
   8 Len Koenecke           9   0   3   0   0   0   0   8   4   0   2   0   0  .333  .333  47.06
   5 Dave Silvestri         5   1   0   0   0   0   0   5   1   0   4   0   0  .000  .000  50.00
   4 Jeff Tackett           2   0   0   0   0   0   1   4   1   0   1   0   0  .000  .000  66.67
   3 players with 2 walks in 2 plate appearances

Highest ranked player not on list: Rickey Henderson (2,190 walks, good for 2nd place).

For this and the next two categories, I used at-bats plus walks and hit by pitches as the denominator in the percentage chart.

Barry Bonds so out-distanced the field in drawing walks that you have to get all the way down to Kal Daniels (with only 57 plate-appearance) to find a player with a higher walk rate. Here is the breakdown of Bonds' extra-inning performance between the first and second half of his career:

  Years     AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
1986-1996  120  20  30   3   2   4  12  38  18   0  24   9   2  .250  .408  24.05
1997-2007   75  28  21   6   1   8  16  52  24   1  14   6   0  .280  .707  40.63
 IBB Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  42 Barry Bonds          195  48  51   9   3  11  28  90  42   1  38  15   2  .262  .508
  30 Pete Rose            283  43  83  19   2   2  27  66  30   4  32   7   1  .293  .396
  30 George Brett         190  34  64  16   1   7  27  51  30   0  16   4   1  .337  .542
  29 Hank Aaron           254  38  76  13   4  14  38  63  29   0  29   7   3  .299  .547
  29 Tony Gwynn           206  33  81  13   0   3  20  43  29   0  13  15   5  .393  .500
  28 Willie Mays          292  57  87  11   6  22  45  58  28   1  40   6   2  .298  .603
  27 Jeff Bagwell         156  30  49   7   1   9  25  51  27   1  31   7   2  .314  .545
  26 Mike Schmidt         175  25  40   6   2   9  27  56  26   1  46   4   0  .229  .440
  26 Dave Parker          236  24  67  16   1   3  12  37  26   0  48   1   5  .284  .398
  25 Duke Snider          151  26  39   5   1   4  23  40  25   1  34   3   1  .258  .384
  25 Rusty Staub          222  25  70  13   0   6  25  41  25   3  20   1   1  .315  .455

 IBB Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  42 Barry Bonds          195  48  51   9   3  11  28  90  42   1  38  15   2  .262  .508  14.69
  21 Paul Goldschmidt      84  15  29   8   0   2   7  36  21   2  17   2   1  .345  .512  17.21
  11 Jose Abreu            45   5  11   2   1   1   6  12  11   0  14   0   0  .244  .400  19.30
   6 Reggie Jefferson      25   0   5   1   0   0   4   6   6   0   7   0   0  .200  .240  19.35
   4 Len Koenecke           9   0   3   0   0   0   0   8   4   0   2   0   0  .333  .333  23.53
   3 Chuck Hostetler        4   0   2   1   0   0   0   4   3   0   0   0   0  .500  .750  37.50
   2 Kim Allen              1   2   0   0   0   0   0   2   2   0   0   0   0  .000  .000  66.67
   9 players were intentional walked in their only plate appearance.

I didn't list rankings for either intentional walks or caught stealing below because we don't have these statistics complete for the period covered, but Albert Pujols (second among the years covered with 310 intentional walks) is not on the list above (18 of his free passes came during extra-innings).

Kim Allen had brief trails in both 1980 and 1981 with the Seattle Mariners. A weak-hitting utility player, Allen received only two intentional walks in his career. They came in an extra-inning game against the Royals, with Dan Quisenberry on the mound for both. Allen turned his second free pass into the go-ahead run in the top of the 14th only to have George Brett's three-run homer win the game for Kansas City with none out in the bottom half.

 HBP Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
   7 Craig Biggio         228  36  64  15   1   3  13  37  14   7  48  12   1  .281  .395    1
   7 Chase Utley          158  30  43  12   1   5  17  34  15   7  30   4   1  .272  .456    5
   7 Danny Espinosa        67  13  16   2   0   1   4   8   5   7  24   5   2  .239  .313  125
   6 Don Baylor           201  39  66  12   0  10  33  21   6   6  21   8   3  .328  .537    2
   6 Derek Jeter          167  21  50   4   0   1  12  26   7   6  35   7   0  .299  .341   12
   6 Jason Kendall        125  17  44   5   1   3  15  13   4   6  18   2   1  .352  .480    3
   6 Rickie Weeks          74   9  17   1   0   0   8  10   2   6  19   7   1  .230  .243   24
  14 players with 5

 HBP Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
   7 Danny Espinosa        67  13  16   2   0   1   4   8   5   7  24   5   2  .239  .313   8.54
   4 Rougned Odor          33   5  12   1   0   3   9   1   0   4   6   0   0  .364  .667  10.53
   2 Ed Coleman             9   2   3   0   1   0   1   0   0   2   1   0   0  .333  .556  18.18
   7 players were hit by a pitch in their only plate appearance.

We talked earlier about Danny Espinosa's 2016 season, when he was hit in three straight extra-inning appearances. Not that anyone was following things like this, but it looked like either Espiniosa or Rickie Weeks would breeze past the rest of the names on the list above, but neither has played in a major league game since 2017.

  SO Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  68 Reggie Jackson       202  27  41   8   0  10  21  39  12   5  68   6   2  .203  .391    1
  65 Willie Stargell      188  23  53   7   2  12  32  38  18   3  65   1   2  .282  .532    8
  56 Jim Thome            153  29  37   8   0  12  26  41  14   0  56   1   0  .242  .529    2
  54 Sammy Sosa           195  29  48   5   0  10  30  26  15   0  54   2   0  .246  .426    4
  51 Fred McGriff         155  13  33   2   0   7  25  44  24   1  51   1   1  .213  .361   11
  49 Frank Robinson       250  45  76   7   1  16  44  60  23   4  49  12   5  .304  .532   58
  48 Carl Yastrzemski     258  30  57  12   2   8  20  65  22   0  48   6   2  .221  .376  101
  48 Lou Brock            253  33  77   8   2   5  27  35  14   1  48  15  12  .304  .411   31
  48 Dave Parker          236  24  67  16   1   3  12  37  26   0  48   1   5  .284  .398   57
  48 Craig Biggio         228  36  64  15   1   3  13  37  14   7  48  12   1  .281  .395   24

  SO Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  68 Reggie Jackson       202  27  41   8   0  10  21  39  12   5  68   6   2  .203  .391  33.66
  65 Willie Stargell      188  23  53   7   2  12  32  38  18   3  65   1   2  .282  .532  34.57
  56 Jim Thome            153  29  37   8   0  12  26  41  14   0  56   1   0  .242  .529  36.60
  43 Mark Reynolds        107  14  20   4   0   6  18  12   3   3  43   4   0  .187  .393  40.19
  38 Jeromy Burnitz        92  15  18   3   1   3  16  26   8   1  38   2   0  .196  .348  41.30
  35 Gorman Thomas         84   8  13   2   0   4  16  14   3   0  35   1   0  .155  .321  41.67
  26 Alejandro de Aza      52   8  12   3   2   0   7   9   1   1  26   1   0  .231  .365  50.00
  21 Dave Nicholson        41   5   5   0   0   1   3   8   0   0  21   0   0  .122  .195  51.22
  17 Jack Cust             28   1   4   2   0   0   1   6   1   0  17   0   0  .143  .214  60.71
  12 Aaron Judge           18   1   1   0   0   1   2   6   1   0  12   1   1  .056  .222  66.67
   9 Billy Ashley          12   1   0   0   0   0   0   3   0   0   9   0   0  .000  .000  75.00
   8 Bobby Hughes          10   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   8   0   0  .100  .100  80.00
   8 Zach Walters          10   1   1   0   0   1   2   0   0   0   8   0   0  .100  .400  80.00
   5 Chad Wallach           5   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   5   0   0  .000  .000 100.00

I went back to using at-bats as the denominator in the percentage chart for this category.

Highest ranked player not on list: Adam Dunn (2,548 strikeouts). His extra-inning stats:

Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
Adam Dunn            108  20  35   7   0   9  25  26   7   4  31   2   0  .324  .639    3

Only Sammy Sosa, Fred McGriff and Dave Parker from the top chart are not in the Hall of Fame, and they each have an MVP award on their resume. So despite this being a unflattering category, this is an impressive collection of offensive talent. Still, just counting their performances in extra-innings, only Willie Stargell, Frank Robinson, and Lou Brock hit as expected, and Reggie Jackson, McGriff, and Carl Yastrzemski hit quite a bit worse.

After the first three entries on the percentage list, there's a collection of low-contact power hitters. Mark Reynolds came within 7 strikeouts of fanning 1000 times in a five-year period (2008-2012), but also hit 164 homers. Gorman Thomas struck out 175 and 170 times in a season back when that was something unusual while combining to hit 83 homers, and so on. Alejandro de Aza is the outlier in the group, with a higher overall batting average than most of the others on the list (.260), the lowest strikeout rate in regulation, and not a lot of power. Still, he earned his place above by fanning in exactly half of his extra-inning at-bats.

  SB Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
  29 Tim Raines           223  44  76  11   1   3  23  50  24   1  16  29   0  .341  .439    3
  27 Rickey Henderson     205  44  56  10   3   4  22  50  11   2  28  27   1  .273  .410    1
  19 Maury Wills          187  19  49   4   1   0  10  29   6   0  19  19   7  .262  .294   11
  17 Eric Davis           113  21  39   7   1   4  14  22  10   0  28  17   3  .345  .531   52
  16 Willie Wilson        126  26  36   1   4   2  17  11   4   1  28  16   2  .286  .405    6
  15 Lou Brock            253  33  77   8   2   5  27  35  14   1  48  15  12  .304  .411    2
  15 Cesar Cedeno         182  25  50   8   2   5  21  29  12   1  24  15   7  .275  .423   15
  15 Tony Gwynn           206  33  81  13   0   3  20  43  29   0  13  15   5  .393  .500   70
  15 Barry Bonds          195  48  51   9   3  11  28  90  42   1  38  15   2  .262  .508   17
  14 Brett Butler         164  22  52   3   2   1   9  30   3   0  24  14   6  .317  .378   13
  14 Juan Samuel          121  20  33   4   2   1   9  17   5   2  26  14   4  .273  .364   39
  14 Marquis Grissom      173  28  52   4   1   6  25  35  11   0  37  14   2  .301  .439   30

  SB Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  29 Tim Raines           223  44  76  11   1   3  23  50  24   1  16  29   0  .341  .439  23.39
  27 Rickey Henderson     205  44  56  10   3   4  22  50  11   2  28  27   1  .273  .410  25.96
  17 Eric Davis           113  21  39   7   1   4  14  22  10   0  28  17   3  .345  .531  29.82
  16 Willie Wilson        126  26  36   1   4   2  17  11   4   1  28  16   2  .286  .405  34.78
  12 Rajai Davis          107  19  19   5   1   0   8   9   1   1  30  12   1  .178  .243  41.38
  11 Jarrod Dyson          49   8  12   1   1   0   1   5   1   0   6  11   1  .245  .306  64.71
   9 Bobby Brown           38   6   8   1   0   1   3   5   1   0  11   9   0  .211  .316  75.00
   6 Matt Alexander         8   7   2   0   0   0   1   1   1   0   1   6   0  .250  .250 200.00
   3 Allan Lewis            2   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   3   0  .000  .000  undef

Highest ranked player not on list: Vince Coleman (752 stolen bases). His extra-inning stats:

Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG Rank
Vince Coleman        118  14  33   3   0   1   8  18   6   2  19  11   6  .280  .331   4

For this and the next category, I'm using hits plus walks plus hit by pitches minus home runs (a very rough approximation of stolen base opportunities) as the denominator in the percentage chart. You'll probably notice that my approximation doesn't handle pinch-runners like Matt Alexander and Allan Lewis.

Tim Raines and Rickey Henderson combined to steal 56 bases while being caught only once. That one came on June 22, 1996, when Henderson was thrown out trying to steal third in the 15th inning of the Padres 9-6 loss to the Cubs. Scott Servais was the catcher.

The first six players on the top chart above all had at least one season with 80 or more steals, and the others all had at least one 50+ steal season.

  CS Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
  12 Lou Brock            253  33  77   8   2   5  27  35  14   1  48  15  12  .304  .411
   9 Joe Morgan           227  40  65  12   3   3  31  55  12   1  19  11   9  .286  .405
   8 Mickey Vernon        191  22  53   8   1   5  26  28  11   0  18   1   8  .277  .408
   7 Maury Wills          187  19  49   4   1   0  10  29   6   0  19  19   7  .262  .294
   7 Cesar Cedeno         182  25  50   8   2   5  21  29  12   1  24  15   7  .275  .423
   7 Dave Collins         118  13  38   4   0   0   9  10   2   2  19  11   7  .322  .356
   8 players with 6

  CS Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG    Pct
  12 Lou Brock            253  33  77   8   2   5  27  35  14   1  48  15  12  .304  .411  11.11
   7 Dave Collins         118  13  38   4   0   0   9  10   2   2  19  11   7  .322  .356  14.00
   6 Bernard Gilkey        81  11  24   7   0   2   8  13   1   1  17   2   6  .296  .457  16.67
   5 Chico Salmon          70  11  13   0   0   0   7   6   1   0  11   2   5  .186  .186  26.32
   3 Joe Pittman           18   4   4   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   3   0   3  .222  .222  60.00
   2 Lee Richard           15   4   1   0   1   0   1   0   0   0   1   1   2  .067  .200 200.00
   2 Sheldon Mallory        7   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   2  .143  .143 200.00
   2 Henry Mateo            4   0   1   0   0   0   2   0   0   0   1   0   2  .250  .250 200.00

With the notable exception of Mickey Vernon, all the players on the first chart had good to excellent success rates, and were probably running in riskier situations due to one-run strategies often employed late in tie games. And even Vernon was not a horrible base stealer early in his career. When he left for World War Two at the age of 25, he'd stolen 59 bases in 77 attempts, a very good success rate for his era. But he was 42 when he retired, and although he rarely attemped to steal a base over his last several years, when he did the results were seldom good. He was thrown out 12 times in his last 14 attempts, including all 3 in extra-innings.

And finally, a long time ago (at the beginning of this article), I mentioned how Harry Simpson's appearance on two "best-game" lists had sent me down this path. So how did he perform over the course of his career in extra-innings? Well, wonder no more:

Player                AB   R   H  2B  3B  HR RBI  BB IBB HBP  SO  SB  CS   AVG   SLG
Harry Simpson         64  13  19   1   4   2   8  12   4   0   8   4   2  .297  .531

So he did better than his career .266 batting average and .486 slugging percentage, but not by as much as we'd suspected, given that the two games that introduced us to his extra-inning prowess saw him get three triples, a homer and a single in five at-bats. Take those away and the above line has him with three extra-base hits (one of each variety) in 59 at-bats. Of course, the results will usually be unimpressive once you take away anyone's two best games from such a small sample size.

That's all for this time, and to those of you still with me, thanks for your patience.